Add a pop of color to your gardenscape.

There is something about color that brings happiness to our souls, whether it be the soothing color of flowers or the majestic masterworks of a sunset. As spring transitions to summer, Mother Nature’s paint brush explodes with colors that ignite our inner artist and imagination. Although this blog is primarily dedicated to raising backyard chickens and the backyard chicken enthusiast way of life, I like to mix in a few gardening hacks as I discover them. Today I will share with you a few very simple and inexpensive ways to add a pop of color to your backyard or garden. All that is needed is a can of spray paint and a bit of imagination.

Most gardeners are familiar with these iron stakes sold at garden or home improvement stores. They go by a myriad of names such as shepherd staffs, hanging basket stakes, garden stakes and so on. As a staple of any well tended garden, they serve a multitude of functions. I have them all over my property and use them for a whole host of purposes. Plant stakes, tree stakes, chicken wire stakes, lattice board stakes, plant hangers, and so on. I lost count of how many I have years ago. As a decorative accent to any landscape the uses are endless. But for the purposes of this post, I am going to show you how you can use these little wonders to add a pop of color to your gardenscape or backyard. Typically sold painted an iron black or dark charcoal, they can be painted to fit any preference.

Hot pink garden accent. This pop of color adds a bit of fun and personality to the garden or backyard setting.

My favorite colors are pink and purple. Armed with a can of hot pink spray paint, I formally endorse, adding a pop of color to this garden accent. Situated in my blueberry row adjacent to the Grape Arbor, it stands out against the backyard colors bringing a bit of personality to the berry row.

Again, with the same can of hot pink spray paint, I add a pop of color to this small shepherds staff situated between my Black Berry Bushes. These brightly colored garden accents and staffs offset the green of the surrounding vegetation, adding a bit of a boho vibe to the garden or backyard setting.

Berry row approaching the Grape Arbor.

Approaching the Grape Arbor, I transition to another color to add a pop of personality to the Pergola. A fitting color for a Grape Arbor setting is a bright purple. Situated around my Pergola are numerous plant stands, garden accents and flower basket hanging staffs. Armed with a can of Purple spray paint, I work my magic adding a pop of color to the Arbor setting.

Pergola Grape Arbor situated at the end of the Berry Row.
Purple hanging basket staff under the Grape Arbor.

A bright purple adds the perfect pop of color to the Pergola. Standing out against the surrounding greenery, purple hanging basket staffs provide a polished look.

Purple staff with chicken feed bags as liners for the hanging baskets.

Another hack I have discovered is a repurposed use for chicken feed bags. Hanging plant baskets are usually displayed with coco basket liners. For as simple as they are, these coco basket liners are pricey and do not retain the essential water needed by the plants. Using empty chicken feed bags, I cut small drainage holes in the bottom, fill with soil and use as liners for the hanging baskets. Feed bags are tough, made of a thick material sufficient to contain 50 pounds of chicken feed or more. As hanging basket liners they are perfect. They are tough, weather well and do not break down like the coco basket liners. Additionally, they retain the crucial moisture needed to adequately keep the plants hydrated. They add the perfect accent to a backyard farm setting.

Purple butterfly garden accent sitting on the ground under Pergola Grape Arbor.

In addition to spray painting hanging basket staffs, I paint garden accents to add a pop of color to the surrounding area. This little detail adds to the whole fun boho vibe of the garden or backyard setting.

Plant stands topped with a terra cotta pot saucer serve as great drink tables. Painted a darker color of purple for contrast, these plant stands add a bit of ease and laid back vibe to the Pergola.

painted garden bench.

Even a garden bench when painted can be used as an outdoor dining tray. Painted the same dark purple as the repurposed plant stands, these accessories add to the overall fun atmosphere of a backyard garden.

Purple garden decor accent.

Got a beloved outdoor decor item that is looking a little bit rough around the edges. A can of spray paint to the rescue. Breathe new life and love into outdoor decor items while coordinating them with your garden setting.

The final look of the Pergola Grape Arbor is stunning!! With a can of spray paint and a bit of imagination, you can transform your garden or backyard setting into a lively atmosphere. In addition to adding a pop of color to your backyard garden, spray paint with added primer will protect your garden accents for years to come.

I hope that you have found some of these hacks useful and can implement them into your own gardenscape or backyard setting. Adding a pop of color to your garden adds a bit of fun and personality your space. Have fun with it and remember that there is no limit to creativity.

Thanks for reading! Till next time, keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

Heritage and Production Breeds. What’s the Difference?

The chickens most of us recognize today are bred for meat or eggs consequently they look vastly different than their ancestors. The breeds that generations past kept to supply eggs for the family are known as Heritage Breeds. Some of us may even recall the chickens that our grandparents kept and how different they looked. It some cases they may not have even looked like the chickens we associate with today at all.

Production breeds are those that are specifically bred for production whether be it meat or eggs. These industries have selected out traits needed to meet demands. These resulting chickens are engineered to have larger breasts, grow very fast, lay profusely or lay larger eggs. The chickens the exist outside of these breeds are known as Heritage breeds. Heritage breeds store a wealth of genetic resources that are important for our future and the future of our agricultural food system. Heritage breeds were once raised by our forefathers. These are breeds of a bygone era, before industrial agriculture became a mainstream practice. It is through the hobby of backyard chicken keepers and enthusiasts that these breeds still exist today.

You may not know it, but by keeping chickens you are acting as a conservationist. Since the meat and egg industry has no need for heritage breeds, its the backyard chicken keepers that keep these breeds from extension. Most of these breeds our grandparents kept as pets or for eggs. Many old photos have captured in time these heritage breeds. As time has march on, along side us has followed our feathered friends.

So, What are some of these Heritage Breeds you may be asking. Below I will introduce you to some of these breeds. Many of these breeds I have others I plan to get in the near future.

The Polish:

The Polish possesses a very complicated history. Many people think that the Polishes came from Poland. This is actually not the case. The word ‘pol” translates as head, most likely derived from the impressive crests of feathers that top their head. It’s not really understood where this fancy breed came from. Some poultry experts think they came from the Netherlands others disagree. As for a fun chicken lovers such as myself,  I wonder if their origins are not of this world after all. Possibly like H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu they came from the stars or another world out there. Just kidding 🙂 In all seriousness though, much mystery surrounds this much beloved Heritage breed. The Polish is a much favored breed for poultry enthusiasts who want a little something different for their backyard flock.

The Polishes as a breed have a very distinctive personality. Due to their featherd crests their vision is limited. With obstructed vision everything spooks them. Seemingly mundane and normal objects in their surrounds will get a rise out of them. For this reason they tend to be high strung and flighty. It takes an experienced keeper with the right setting to successfully keep this breed.

To their determent they are also a very curious breed. Individuals will often follow their curiosities into predicaments. Unable too see well enough to get out, they will call out to other members of the flock to rescue them. Typically one or more of the rooster will answer the call. They are the comedians of the chicken world. I have 14 of these fancy guys and gals of various colors. All of them possess this particular niche for curiosity and comedy.

Buff Orpington:

One of the most beloved and most common Heritage breed kept by backyard enthusiasts is the Buff Orphington. These lovely ladies and gents are often sold in feed stores and are very harty. I personally have seen many old photos capturing this breed. When I started keeping chickens this was the first breed I ordered. Buff Orpington’s are known the world over for being friendly fluffs of feathers. In my experience I will have to concur.

These ladies and gents are known as the “golden retrievers” of the chickens world and for good reason. They are very loyal and form strong attachments to their keepers. My Buff ladies follow me around the backyard as I do morning and evening chores. When I do any work in the backyard such as potting or planting flowers and crops I have plenty of “hen help”. They want to be involved in anything that I am doing no matter what it is.

I currently have 5 of these golden girls, at 10 years of age they are the oldest girls in my flock. No longer spring chickens, these ladies are the zen masters of my flock. They have seen and lived through it all. I will often find one or more of these ladies on my lap when I sit down. They love attention and will follow me chatting till I pick them up and hold them. They are very friendly and make a great breed for beginning chicken keepers.

Besides buff there are other colors of Orpington available. While buff and black are the most common, blue and lavender are also available. Lavender and jubilee are the rarest and cost quite a bit when purchased from hatcheries or breeders. If you can obtain them they will be the pride and joy of the flock. I plan to purchase lavender and jubilee Orpington in the near future.

Australorp:

Related to the Orpington, the Australorp is the Australian take on the Orpington. They were developed as a breed to focus on egg laying. Australorps achieved world-wide popularity in the 1920’s after the breed broke numerous world records for the number of eggs laid in a year. In fact, the world record holder for the most eggs laid in a year was set by an Australorp. She laid 364 eggs in one year, taking only one day off. The most common color is black which is the only color recognized in the United States. However, blue and white are still recognized in Australia.

For backyard keepers who want chickens just for eggs, Australorps are the best bang for your buck. They are one of the most common breeds found in feed stores and like the Orpington are very friendly and affectionate.

Easter Eggers:

The Easter Egger is a favorite breed because the hens lay multi colored eggs. For this reason they are sometimes referred to as rainbow layers. Eggs colors will vary by individual and can be anything from blue to brown. Colors such as blue, green, pink, white, beige and brown have all been reported. A hen will have her own color and will lay only that color for the rest of her life. This breed is often found in feed stores and are sometime mis-labeled as Araucania or Ameraucana. Because of the multi line breeding Easter Eggers come in many colors such as brown, black, white, Buff, and golden lace. The Pigment oocyanin deposited on the surface of the shell is what gives the eggs the famous blue/green color. As a breed they are hardy, friendly and excellent layers.

The Cochin:

The Cochin is another favorite Heritage breed because they are so docile. Literally big balls of fluff, the Cochins’ are one of the friendliest breeds. They are not good layers but make excellent mothers and will happily sit on eggs no matter who laid them. They are very affectionate and enjoy interacting with their keepers. I have several varieties of Cochins such as Motted (specked), frizzle and black. Even the roosters are very docile and friendly. If eggs are the primary reason for keeping chickens they are not the best selection. Their egg laying is fairly poor but they make up for their lacking egg potential in other ways.

Silkies:

Ah, yes, Silkies the teddy bears of the chicken world. It’s no secret that Silkies are the most beloved of the ornamental chicken breeds. Voted again and again as the best breed to have for kids. Silkies are quite possibly the favorite Heritage breed of numerous backyard chicken enthusiasts and for good reason. Silkies are very sweet, docile and friendly. The girls make excellent mothers, are very broody and affectionate. Silkie are often kept by backyard chicken keepers for their broody tendencies. They will happily sit on any available eggs, hatch and raise whatever pops out of them. They don’t care as long as they get to have babies. It has been said that a broody Silkie could hatch rocks. After keeping them I can say I completely agree with this sentiment.

I have a flock of Silkies on my hobby farm and are absolutely smitten. Even the 7 Silkie roosters I have are well behaved. Actually, Silkie roosters make very poor protectors, they prefer to run and hide rather than man up. Lucky I have other roosters in the yard to pick up the slack when everyone is out free ranging.

Silkies are a very old breed. They originated in Asia and were brought to the Western World via the Silk Road a major trading round in Asia. Silkies date back to the Chinese Han dynasty (around 206BCE). The breeds was first mentioned by Marco Polo in his journals that he kept on this trip through China (1290-1300). He recorded in his journal referencing a “furry chicken”.

After Marco Polo’s mention about a ”furry chicken” there was not much said about the Silkie till about 1589. Ulysses Aldrovandi a writer and naturalist published a work on a “wool-bearing chicken”. He described it as “clothed with hair like a cat”.

Silkies get their unique feathering due to the lack of barbicels in their feathers. Barbicels give feathers the smooth texture and appearance we commonly associate with feathers. It is for this reason that Silkies do not like getting wet. If kept in wet climates a keeper needs to see it that their digs are well sheltered and dry. Contrary to popular opinion they do tolerate cold climates well as long as they are able to remain dry.

After Silkies made it to the Western World the breed was recognized officially in North America with acceptance into the Poultry Standard of Perfection in 1874.

In the 21st century, Silkies are one of the most popular and ubiquitous ornamental breed. They are often kept by backyard chicken enthusiasts as pets. Although not a heritage breed like others discussed. The Silkie is a breed that is alive and well thanks to the concervational efforts of backyard chicken keepers who care for and raise them.

Silver Lace Wyandotte:

The gems of my chicken yard are my Silver Lace Wyandotte’s. I have 4 of these fancy ladies and are absolutely smitten with them. Like the Orpington and Australorp they are very friendly and great layers. The Wyandotte is a purely American breed developed in the 1870’s and named after the Wyandot people of North America.

Many people keep this breed to show at county and state fairs. With their striking black and white feathers they looked like they are dressed up for a Gala. I too obtained my Silver Lace Ladies for this reason. They are head turners capturing the attention of anyone who sees them. I am often asked by visitors to my farm what these ladies are. I get many comments on how beautiful and striking they are. They are the pride and joy of my flock.

Like the Orphingtons and the Australorps, Wyandotts are friendly and very docile. They are often found at the bottom of the pecking order due to their docile temperament. If you want some class in your flock the Wyandotts are a great choice. Since they are available in most feed stores and co-ops they are readily available.

Other Heritage Breeds:

The Heritage Breeds I have discussed thus far I currently have. However, there are many more to choose from. Below I will give honorable mention to other beloved Heritage breeds. Before I go any further, I want to thank my fellow backyard chicken enthusiasts and friends (who have asked to remain anonymous) for sharing their experience with these breeds. I do not currently have the following breeds but have connections to those who can vouch for the temperament of these breeds based on their own experiences.

Rhode Island Red:

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The Rhode Island Red is one of the most common breeds kept by backyard enthusiasts. They are one of the most common breeds found in co-ops during the spring. The Rhode Island Red is a purely American breed. It is actually the state bird of Rhode Island. This breed was developed in the early 19th century by cross breeding two other well known breeds, leghorn and Malay. As common as this breed may seem it is actually on the “watch” list by the Livestock Conservancy.

The Rhode Island Red gets it’s name from the color of its plumage. Other keepers have stated that this breed is friendly with a good nature but they can be a bit pushy. They are a tough breed, resistant to illness, good at foraging and free ranging. They are hardy breed, lay well, typically docile, friendly and for these reasons they make a good choice for those starting out with backyard chickens.

Plymouth Rock:

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Plymouth_Rock_hen.

The Plymouth Rock is the oldest American breed. It was first breed in the early 19th century and was seen coast to coast before the end of World War 2. Almost everyone kept them, it was encouraged by the Government as food for the troops who were fighting over seas. For much of the 20th century it was the most common breed in the United States. Unfortunately after the 2nd World War, it declined in popularity and has been listed on the American Livestock Conservancy as “recovering”.

As a breed, the Plymouth Rock is docile in nature, tame very easily and hardy making them a great choice for beginning backyard yard chicken enthusiasts. The Plymouth Rock is a good general farm chicken. They are docile with a leaning toward broodiness. They are quality layers of medium large eggs.

The Sussex:

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Light_Sussex_rooster_-_Collingwood_Children%27s_Farm.

This Sussex is named after it’s location of origin Sussex, England and is among the oldest of British breeds. In fact, the first ever poultry show was held in London in 1845. One of the first exhibits was a chicken breed simply called Sussex or Kentish Fowl. This was the beginnings of the “Sussex Breed”. Although Kent was mentioned, the birds’ were thereafter addressed only as Sussex.

The Sussex is a very ancient breed in Englands history. Records show that the Sussex dates back to the time of the Roman Invasion of 43 A.D. Of course they looked nothing like they do today but their origins are anything but new.

The time of breeding and various color varieties came about when hen fever hit England in the Victorian Era. The Sussex was breed with other Heritage Breeds such as the Cochin and Brahma to get today’s look of a robust and well-proportioned bird. Today there are several colors available such as red and speckled, brown, buff, white, silver. However, The American Poultry Association only recognized Red and Speckled. Speckled is a beautiful bird which sports a mahogany and while speckled plumage. With successive molts the color get better. The Light is the coloration most associated with this breed. Birds’ with light coloration have white bodies with black neck and tail feathers.

Other chicken keepers and friends that I have talked to say that this breed is docile and friendly. They are easy to handle and love to forage. They are very thrifty, if they are allowed to free range they are able to gather most of their needs from this activity. Several of my friends have said that they are very curious and will follow their keepers around the yard. They enjoy attention and are very interactive and talkative with their keepers.

As for laying potential , they are good layers laying about 4-5 brown eggs a week. They will continue to lay through the winter when most other breeds have shut down production for the year. They only take a break from laying during molting.

Some keepers have said that they have a tendency to go broody and make good mothers. A fellow poultry keeper and friend of mine says that she has two girls who happily sit on eggs every year hatching and raise clutches of chicks for her. She loves her Sussex momma hens and can count on them to give her new chicks every spring.

In my interview process, one downfall of the breed was mentioned. This breed has a tendency towards obesity. If you want them fattened for the table that is fine, but if you want them to continue to ay eggs, than you need to keep their diet and weight in check. They best way to do this is to keep treats to a minimum and only allow them to get their nutrition from a quality feed and foregoing.

The Sussex is a great breed to have around children, they enjoy the company of their keepers, are talkative, loved being held and stroked. They are low mainenance and are thriftily if allowed to free range.

Leghorn:

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Leghorn_cockerel_and_hen.

Foghorn Leghorn, for those that remember Loony Tunes cartoons, Foghorn was the Rooster who was always being tortured by a little chicken hawk. He was probably the best known Leghorn chicken in the world! These two characters are my favorite Loony Tunes. Foghorn Leghorn as his name suggests is a Leghorn Cock. In his honor, the next Heritage Breed that I will give honorable mention to is the Leghorn.

The Leghorn’s originated in Tuscany, in central Italy. The breed was introduced to North America in 1828 from the port city of Livorno. In America they were originally called “Italians”, by 1865 the breed was known as “Leghorn”.

The exact history of the Leghorn breed is unknown. There were several small breeds of land chickens roaming in the region of Tuscany Italy. From these, the Leghorn was born. When the Leghorn made it to the UK in 1870 the English did not like the small body of the Leghorn. So It was crossed with the Minorca to give it a more robust frame. Despite the breeding the Leghorn still remains a relatively thin bird.

Contrary to popular opinion, Leghorn’s come in a variety of colors black, brown, white, buff, and silver or grey. The breed was admitted to the American Poultry Association in 1874.

A few friends and fellow backyard chicken enthusiasts of mine report that the Leghorn is a very intelligent and resourceful bird. They are able to find much of their food on their own if allowed to free range which reduces the feed bill. They are good flyers and will often fly into trees to roost if allowed. They can be a bit noisy, definitely not a good breed for an urban setting.

Another friend of mine said that they are a lot like the Polish breed. They get bored easily so a keeper needs to proved plenty of room and things to do if they are confined to a pen. They are also a bit aloof from human contact not really interested in interacting with their keepers.

As for laying potential they are good layers, laying about 230-320 eggs per year. That’s about 5+ eggs a week, making Leghorn hens an egg laying machine. For this reason they make a great staple for a farm setting. They are not very broody, in fact its very rare for a Leghorn hen to go broody. If a hen accidentally hatches a chick they make terrible mothers. If you want to procreate your flock its best to use an incubator or broody hen from another breed such as the Silkie to raise the chicks for you.

If you want a chicken breed that is cuddly and friendly, the Leghorn is not the way to go. However, if you don’t want to make friends of your backyard chickens and just want eggs, they are a great choice. Additionally, if allowed to free range they are very self-sufficient reducing the feed bill making them relatively cheap to keep.

Brahma:

Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Leghorn_cockerel_and_hen.

The Brahma is an American Breed of chicken. It was developed in the United States from birds imported from China and was the principle American meat bird from 1850 until about 1930.

Few breeds have as much controversy as to their origins as does the Brahma Chicken. While widely varied claims were originally accepted by early poultry associations, the truth of the matter is that this breed was developed in America by breeding a very large fowl imported from China.

At first there were many different strains and at least a dozen names for the breed. At a meeting in Boston in 1852 an agreement was reached to name it “Brahmapootra” which later was shortened to just “Brahma”. From the beginning Brahmas have been recognized not only for their incredible size but for their practical qualities. Brahmas are very harty and good egg layers. Considered great winter layers, Brahma’s will lay right through the winter only talking a break during molt.

Farmed for its size and known as the “King of Chickens”, the Brahma chicken is appreciated for its great size, strength and vigor. These birds are huge, males can grow to reach 17-18 pounds and the hens can reach anywhere from 13-15 pounds. A typical Brahma Rooster can stand 30 inches tall. Despite its impressive size, the breed is known to be very docile and friendly.

I have one backyard chicken friend who has these impressive birds. She described their disposition as gentile and non-aggressive. It can be easy to be intimated by these giants but there temperament does not match their stature. They are friendly and docile with a calm disposition. They are very easy to handle but due to their weight they can become heavy quickly.

They make great mothers and are committed to sitting on the nest. However, due to the size of the hen a keeper needs to keep a close eye on the chick for the first few days. The small chick can be easily injured or killed if it is accidentally stepped on by the mother hen.

If allowed to free range they are well adapted to forage for food making them a self sustaining breed. They are an excellent breed to have with children present. Although very large they are very docile and non-aggressive. They make a great choice for 4H projects. If you choose to keep these massive birds make sure that the coop is large enough to accommodate their larger than average size. The roosts need to be larger and sturdy, pens and nesting boxes need to be larger as well.

Although known as the “King of Chickens”, the Brahmas are second in line in size, surpassed by the Jersey Giant. The next Heritage Breed I will examine is the largest of all chicken breeds.

Jersey Giant:

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The Jersey Giant as its name suggests is the largest and heaviest of all chicken breeds. It was created in Burlington County, New Jersey in the late 19th century. The roosters top out about 17-19 pounds while the hens top out around 13-15 pounds. The males stand between 28-30 inches tall, the hens being 16-20 inches tall. Making these birds at eye level with the Brahma and slightly heavier.

The Jersey Giant was originally breed to create a chicken that could potentially replace the turkey as a premium table bird. During breeding several large breeds were used the Black Java’s, Dark Brahmas and Black Langshans.

As far as egg laying in concerned, the hens tend to lay more eggs than those of other heavy breeds. The eggs are extra-large in size with color varying from dark brown to light cream.

I have an on-line fellow backyard chicken keeper who raises this breed. She described the temperament of the Jersey Giant as docile , mellow and friendly. Even the roosters are very docile and tame. She keeps her flock of Jersey Giants as pets rather than their intended purpose. They are very good with her kids. Her children were at one point afraid of them but now they have grown to love their backyard giants.

According to her, the hens don’t really go broody. They may act like they want to sit on the nest but lose interest soon after. She uses an incubator to procreate her flock. They free range and forage well. Due to their large size they are not easy prey for hawks. Egg laying is good, hens lay about 150-200 eggs per year, that’s about 2-4 eggs per week. The eggs are very large, a bit larger than X-large eggs sold in the stores. They vary between cream, light and medium brown in color.

The Jersey Giant is an impressive bird worthy of the time and effort required to raise them. Due to their large size they require lots of space as to avoid problems caused by over crowding. This is one breed that I have wanted to keep but due to my space limitation my property is not well suited. But for those who have the space and requirements necessary to keep them they would be well worth the time.

Dominique:

Image Credit: https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DominiqueCockZeus.

The Dominique, also known as the dominicker or Pilgrim Fowl, is a breed that was developed in the United States during the colonial period. It is considered America’s first chicken breed. It is most likely descended from chickens brought to New England from southern England during colonial times.

The Dominique could be found on farms far and wide until about the 1920’s when the breed waned due to the passing of long time Dominique enthusiasts and breeders. Due to its hardiness and ease of up-keep the breed survived the Great Depression. By the end of World War II the breed once again experienced decline. By the 1970’s only 4 known flocks remained. The remaining owners were contacted and participated in a breed rescue program to save the Dominique. From 1983 till about 2006, Dominiques numbers steadily rose again. As of 2007 numbers are once again starting to fall, placing the breed on The Livestock conservancy’s “watch” list. If there is one breed that we as backyard chicken keepers should take interest in, its this one. It is only through the efforts of backyard chicken keepers that this breed will escape extinction.

As expected from the breeds history, I have no backyard enthusiast friends that currently keep this breed. However, according to my research, this breed is first and foremost an egg producer. Hens average between 230-275 small to medium-size brown eggs a year. That averages to about 3-4 eggs per week.

The disposition of the Dominique is said to be sweet, gentile, calm and docile. They are friendly often following their owners around the yard hoping for treats. The hens are said to occasionally be broody and are good mothers, attentive to their chicks.

The Dominique is robust and hardy with little in the way of health issues. They are low maintenance and quite self-sufficient thus they make a great breed for first time chicken owners.

Although breeding programs have been successful, the numbers of Dominique chickens worldwide remain very low. With the surge of the backyard chicken movement numbers are holding steady. It is only through backyard chicken enthusiasts that this breed still exists. If there is one breed that needs our help as chicken keepers, its this one. I plan to add a few Dominiques to my flock as soon as I can.

The New Hampshire:

Image Credit: https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New_Hampshire_Red_Hen.

The New Hampshire is an American Breed that originated in the state of New Hampshire. Using Rhode Island Reds, poultry farmers performed selective breeding generation after generation to create a bird that grew rapidly, feathered faster, matured earlier and had greater vigor. The resulting product was The New Hampshire Red a close cousin to the Rhode Island Red. The Breed was admitted into the American Standard of Perfection in 1935.

The New Hampshire is a relatively new breed, roughly the same size as the Rhode Island Red. The hens are good layers producing about 200 large light brown eggs a year. This equates to about 3 eggs a week. It is a family friendly bird, making great pets, due to ease of care they are a good breed for first time chicken keepers.

If you are looking for a bird that is good for both meat and egg laying, this is the breed for you. Due to aggressive breeding they are generally disease resistant, cold hearty and robust.

Mayans: Black Copper

Image Credit: https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cuckoo_Marans.

The breed that seems to be all the range today are the Mayans. Relatively new to the backyard chicken scene, the Marans have been around since the 1900’s. A French breed, originated in the port town of Marans, in Nouvelle-Aquitaine a region of south-western France. The Marans are descended from feral fighting game chickens imported from Indonesia and India. A favorite at poultry shows, they are known for laying extremely dark eggs.

There are 9 recognized colors in the French Standard: cuckoo, golden cuckoo, black, birchen, black copper, wheaten, black-tailed, buff, white and Colombian. Of these, the black copper is the favorite among backyard chicken enthusiasts.

These birds are absolutely beautiful, pictures do not do them justice. They have a remarkable plumage. The overall body feathers are deep black which gleam with a green iridescence in the sunlight. The hackle feather are a reddish/coppery tone, contrasting nicely with the black body feathers.

The Marans are a new breed in the United States, accepted by the American Poultry Association is 2011- a recent arrival.

I have a few fellow chicken keeper friends who raise this breed. They are said to have a quiet disposition, gentile and friendly. The roosters have a tendency to be a bit confrontational with other roosters. The hens are docile but are not lap chickens like some other breeds. They are a very active breed and enjoy free ranging.

Marans are renowned for their very dark brown/chocolate eggs. The hens are good layers, giving you around 3 eggs/week, which works out to about 150-200 eggs/year.

Marans are considered to be rare in the United States. They are much more common in their home land of France. They are one of the more expensive breeds to purchase from hatcheries, single chicks ranging between $10-20. Once established, they make quite a statement in your flock.

Hamburg:

Image Credit: https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Silver-Spangled_Hamburg_Sam_dinner.

The Hamburg chicken is one of the several breeds that most resemble the chickens of the wild. Hamburg chickens were found in Holland in the 14th century but its unclear when they first arrived. Around 1785 Hamburgs made their way to England. Later in 1856 Hamburgs were embraced in America and were desired for their egg production potential.

As a breed, Hamburgs possess great activity and alertness. Hens are known to prefer nesting in hedges and have a habit of roosting at night in trees. During their time in England it was believed that the Hamburgs were a hybrid across between wild chickens and pheasants. Hamburgs are prolific egg layers of small white eggs. The breed’s true gift is their ability to lay a large number of eggs over several years. They mature early, reaching laying age at about 4-5 months, 2-3 months earlier than most laying breeds.

Like the Polish, Hamburgs tend to be flap-happy and flightly. They have tendencies to fly away. It is not uncommon for keepers to find them perching and roosting high in trees. For this reason it is best for keepers to keep them contained to a roomy Pen. To keep this breed happy, pens need to have a lot of verticle space with plenty of roosting options, heigh roosts are preferable. They are one of the more noises breeds, definitely not a good choice for Urban backyard chicken keepers.

Hamburgs are considered rare in the United States. They can be acquired from breeders or hatcheries that specializes in rare and very rare breeds. If kept they will be a spice of life in your coop.

I think I’m going to cut it off here. This post has already become lengthy, possibly the longest post I have ever composed. However, I feel it is important to acquaint you with some of the Heritage Breeds that shaped our past and now our further. There are many more Heritage breeds to talk about, the ones I mentioned are some of the more popular ones kept by backyard chicken enthusiasts.

As backyard chicken keepers we are the conservationists keeping many of these breeds from extinction. Since the meat and egg industry have no need for these birds it is though our passions that they still exist. Breeds such as the Dominique really need our help to keep them round for generations to come. Without our efforts and interest our Heritage Breeds would be lost forever a victim of the passage of time. Many of us keep chickens as a connection to the past, simpler days of a bygone era. Our feathered friends carry with them history as many of our grandparents and ancestors kept the same breeds that now roam our backyards.

I hope that you enjoyed this post, and maybe even enlightened you to the importance of our Heritage Breeds. If you have any questions please leave a comment, I will get back to you as soon as I can.

As always, thank for reading. Till next time, keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

Resources: The Livestock Conservancy https://www.livestockconservancy.org/

Photos: Wiki Creative Commons, myself and fellow poultry enthusiasts.

 

NPIP Certification

When it comes to keeping backyard chickens there are lots of decisions that a keeper needs to make. In addition to breeds, coops, whether or not to have a rooster there is NPIP certification. In the post I will detail what NPIP Certification is and if it is something that you want to do for your flock.

What is NPIP Certification?

In short NPIP stands for National Poultry Improvement Plan. The NPIP is a voluntary program overseen by the United States of Agriculture (USDA) and managed by each state.
The program monitors flocks and hatcheries for a variety of serious diseases that can devastate chicken populations and create serious problems for the poultry industry or backyard chicken enthusiasts.

The NPIP program was first established in 1935 as a way to eliminate Pullorum, a disease that devastated the poultry industry in the late 1920’s. The program was later refined to include backyard chicken keepers and test for other serious diseases such as Salmonella Pullorum, Salmonella Gallinarum, Salmonella Enteritidis, Mycoplasma Gallisepticum, Mycoplasma Synaviae, Mycoplasma Meleagridis and in 2006 Avian Influenza

NPIP Certified hatcheries adhere to a set of established standards that ensure that the birds they sale are free from diseases listed above. Testing involves taking blood samples from their flocks, swabs from their birds throats, adhering to sanitation and biosecurity procedures.

Hatcheries are required to test their flocks for the diseases included in the certification set out by the USDA. Testing procedures can vary from state to state but most require a testing for Avian Influenza (AI) and various forms of Salmonella. Typically a cross selection of 300 birds will be tested. If a hatchery has less than 300 birds than every single bird is then tested and must re-test annually to keep their certification up to date.

So what does this mean for the backyard flock owner?

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As a perspective backyard chicken keeper looking to start or add to an existing flock, it is best to buy from a breeder that is NPIP Certified. Most hatcheries are certified but there are a few out there that are not. Some hatcheries will list on their webpage that they are NPIP Certified along with their certification number. If you do not see where they are NPIP certified just ask. Any hatchery that is NPIP certified will readily and freely prove to you that they are certified and will give your their NPIP certification number. If they are certified you can be sure that you are buying from a reputable breeder or hatchery that holds animal husbandry to the highest standard.

 

As a backyard chicken keeper, if you plan on breeding or selling chicks or chickens it is a good idea to get your flock NPIP Certified. Not only are you ensured that your flock is healthy and that you are selling healthy birds but it offers you a hedge of protection should the birds you sold be reported sick. If there is an investigation into the origin of the birds sold you will have a hedge of protection in that your flock is NPIP Certified. That’s not to say that just because a source is NPIP Certified that birds cannot get sick. It will reveal in the event of an investigation that your flock is healthy and gets routine health inspections that is documented by your State Veterinarian.

It also give you a peace of mind as well. For example, if there is an outbreak of AI in your area, a State Veterinarian will be dispatched to your home to test your birds for AI. Since your property is cataloged in your county offices that you have chickens you will literally get a knock at your door requesting to test your flock. Some people find this comforting, others find it intrusive. Some feel that registering your flock and having them NPIP Certified relinquishes too much control to “Big Brother”. This is where the individual keepers preference comes into play. I personally have my flock NPIP Certified. Not only do I find it comforting that should AI be detected in my area, the USDA would be on it testing my birds. But if I sale any chicks or adult laying hens I am confident that I am selling healthy birds and have the certification to back it up.

How does an owner certify their flock?

If you decide that NPIP certification is something that you want to do, getting them certified is very easy. Simply look up your State Veterinarian on the web or in the phone book and give them a call. Simply tell them that you are a backyard chicken keeper and that you want to have your flock NPIP certified.

 

 

At that time your information will be recorded and you will get a call from a USDA agent in a few days to schedule a testing date. If you have a large flock say 50 birds or more, plan on taking the day off work to have your flock certified. The agents will literally test every one of your birds individually.

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They will take a small sample of blood and swab their throats. You as the keeper will be responsible for retrieving each bird, bringing them to the inspectors, and keeping track of who has been tested. Once tested each bird will be issued an ankle bracelet with a number on it, each number is specific to each bird and is logged into a computer. This number is their state ID. Should you need to call the State Veterinarian at a later date about a bird you will need to reference the number on their ankle bracelet.

This is another perk of having your flock NPIP Certified. If you have any questions about health or other illness related questions, you have someone to call. Many local Vets will not see “livestock” in their office. They may be able to answer some general questions but as for advising you in detail they may be limited. The State Veterinarian will know how to answer or direct your questions relating to your flock to qualified sources.

In my early days I called my local State Vet several time to clarity issues or find treatment direction for basic illness. They were an amazing resource that I readily used. If you call with a suspicious illness such as symptoms of AI, an inspector will be dispatched to your property to test your birds. If you have suspicious deaths (you do not know the cause of death) they will conduct a necropsy or an animal autopsy on the deceased birds to determine what took the animals life. It will then be determined if this is something to be concerned about in relation to the rest of your flock. They are an immense source of information and guidance if you find yourself in a situation where you need expert advice or help.

How much does it cost to get your flock NPIP Certified?

The final aspect the of NPIP Certification that I will touch on is how much it costs. The cost depends on your state, each state will have different rates and procedures of how they go about conducting a NPIP certification. In the state of Tennessee, where I live our State Vet charged $25 for an inspection and certification. It is in the best interest of the state that keepers certify their flocks so they try to make it simple and affordable.

Each year or every other year depending on your state, your flock will be up for renewal. Each year the flock owner is required to pay the nominal fee to renew their NPIP Certificate. The fee in my case was rendered at time of service directly the inspectors after they tested all my birds. Several days after the inspection of your flock takes place, you will receive a card in the mail with your issued NPIP Participant #. This is for your records or anytime you need to prove your NPIP status. Below is an old card that I received for a NPIP Certification several year ago.

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I have never regretted getting my flock NPIP Certified. Although I am not an active breeder I find value in knowing that my flock is healthy. I also found the NPIP certification process valuable in learning how to conduct my own health inspections on my birds and what dangerous symptoms to look for in relation to serious illness in my flock. The most important aspect that I value from the NPIP process is the network of contacts I can call should I find myself in the unfortunate situation where I need professional help for my flock. There is a peace of mind knowing that I am only a phone call away from people who are knowledgeable should I need to tap into that resource.

I hope that this post has helped answer some question relating to NPIP Certification. If you have any questions that I did not cover in this post please feel free to leave me a comment. I will get back to you as soon as I can. That’s what I’m here for.

As always, thanks for reading. Till next time keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Can Backyard Chickens make you sick?

Hi everyone!! I hope your summer has been well and that you packed all the fun into it as humanly possible. I know I have been absent for a while, its been a busy summer. Its funny how the summer months can turn an average functioning family into a frenzy. Well that is what summer has been like for us, been busy with activities and of course keeping up what the girls, growing and harvesting season. With the majority of the gardens work behind me I wanted to take the time to touch on a subject that I have been asked by several of my followers. Can owning backyard chickens make you sick?

Earlier this month the CDC released an article/report that backyard chickens are responsible for salmonella outbreaks across the country. Sickening people even sending some to the hospital, but so far no deaths have occured, well that’s good. As fear riddening as this sounds I want to take the time and put my two cents in and tell my side of the story as a backyard chicken keeper.

The long and short of it is Yes, backyard chickens can make you sick, but so can your cat, dog, and pet parrot. You see any animal that lays eggs carries the salmonella bacteria, this include, pet turtles, snakes, bearded dragons, and of course backyard chickens. It is a bacteria that all egg laying animals/reptiles carry in their body. This is why it is advisable that one wash your hands good with soap and water after handling. It a pretty simple common sense step to take to avoid illness after contact with pets that can carry the salmonella bacteria. Not that this gets your cat and dog off free and easy without incident. Cats and dogs especially if they are allowed to run free outside can also make you sick. They too can come into contact with pathogens that can be transmitted to you. So really your small flock of backyard chickens are no more dangerous to your health then fluffy or fido.

So why does the CDC single out backyard chickens? Well, I think that the answer is two fold. One, keeping backyard chickens has a direct impact on the factory farm producers of eggs and for some, meat for the table. When consumers take it upon themselves to have a say in where their food comes from the big factory farm producers take a big hit.

It does not help their matters that the backyard chicken movement has exploded by leaps and bounds. Keeping backyard chickens is no more common than a family having a dog roaming the backyard. Even cities have passed laws to allow residents to keep a small number of hens in the small plots behind their homes. Its a movement that is growing every year which is one reason why people like me who blog about backyard chickens are seeing an huge increase in readers. Potential keepers are seeking out information on how to care and sustain a small backyard flock, this is where people like me come into play.

Secondly, I think part of the problem is that people are cuddling their chickens like they would a cat or dog and innevertatnly getting sick in the process. The CDC is right when they state that you should not kiss your pet chickens or allow young kids to hold chicks. This is because young children have an increase risk of putting their hands in their mouths after interacting with chicks. But this same rule can be applied to any pet, not just backyard chickens.

So, what is my stance you may be asking? Well to put it simply, wash your hands! I have been a keeper of backyard chickens for almost 10 years now, I have never become sick due to handling or having contact with my flock. The only chicken I have contracted illness from and took ill was from chicken that I ordered at a restaurant.

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My girls have never made me sick in anyway or caused any ill effect in the entire time I have been keeping chickens. Protecting yourself and your family from illness takes nothing more than a common sense approach. Whenever I come inside from interacting the girls the first thing I do is wash my hands well with soap and water. I don’t need to submerge my self in alcohol or bleach, a simple thorough hand washing is all that is needed. Additionally, I only wear my “coop” cloths into the backyard when interacting with my girls. Not only is this just a good common sense move, it keeps me from getting my nice cloths dirty. Chickens can be messy so I would not want to wear nice cloths to the backyard anyway. So wearing cloths that I don’t mind getting dirty that I wear no where else and take off and put directly in the washer after coming inside is nothing more than common sense.

So as you can see just taking simple steps after spending time with the girls is all that is needed. One need not be afraid to own or handle backyard chickens because all that is needed to protect yourself a simple act of washing your hands well after contact.

Now, as far as kissing backyard chickens this is probably advice well worth taken. I love my girls, but I never kiss them for several reasons. Chickens are very interested in human eyeballs, they look like treats to them, I cannot tell you how many times I have seen pics of people on facebook after getting pecked in the eye by their chicken. It hurts and in some cases and cause irreversible damage. So to keep my eyes safe I keep my face well out of the way of the curiosity of a chicken. It just makes perfect sense.

Secondly, kissing your chicken can be hazardous for your health. I know that a lot of people do, but the line stops there for me. I will tell my girls how much a love them and how pretty they are but my lips are never laid on them. They live outside bathe in dirt and can carry some pathogens on their feathers that I would rather not have in my mouth. So, my love line stops there, I do not kiss my birds. So, yes, backyard chickens can make you sick but the routes to avoid this are very simple and only require soap, water, and facial/eyeball distance.

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So, enjoy your backyard birds just make sure to wash your hands and keep your eyes and lips away from their curious beaks. If you practice good hygienic common sence you will have a very happy relationship with your girls enjoying all the benefits of having backyard chickens.

Till next time, keep on crowing.

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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The TARDIS has landed!!

Hello again everyone!!! The girls and I have been doing well, trying to survive mud season here on the Kuntry Klucker farm. That annoying season between winter and spring, with all the rain we have had it is hard to keep up. Hopefully here in a few weeks we will start to dry out and begin getting the gardens ready for spring planting. In the meantime though we have been up to another coop project. That is right, the Kuntry Klucker Crew once again gets new neighbors. Allow me to introduce to you the TARDIS! For those of you who are Dr. Who fans you know very well what the TARDIS is. For those not so familiar, it stands for Time And Dimension In Space. On our farm here its Time And Dimension In Space chicken style!

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This coop is for my son. I have two little Kuntry Kluckers one of which has been bitten by the addictive chicken bug. We are huge Dr. Who fans so we looked around to find a coop that could best resemble a TARDIS. We lucked out and found this beautiful design at our local Tractor Supply. The girls of this coop will all be named after Dr. Who companions, the boys will be named Strax and Hydroflax. The Kuntry Klucker Crew as always are very curious about anything that comes into the backyard the Bantam Boutique crew as well. So once again we add one more coop to our little coop neighborhood here at the Kuntry Klucker farm.

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This was by far the most complex of coops that we have put together. It took three of us working for 4 hours to finally bring the TARDIS to life. It is a very solid and heavy coop so I am confident that like the Bantam Boutique, it will handle whatever mother nature throws its way. So, once again the girls get to watch the construction of yet another coop in their coop-hood paradise.

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The box containing the coop was massive. It took up the entire bed of a large pickup truck to get it here. Since this coop weighs upwards of 150 pounds, we opened the box on the drive way and carried it to the backyard piece by piece for construction. Due to the enormity of this coop I had to keep the Kuntry Klucker and the Bantam Botique Crew in their pens for their safely. From inside their pens there were very attendive to what was going on around them. We were serenaded by Enigma who through his crowing let us know that we were being heavily supervised.

Once we hauled the coop piece by piece to the backyard construction began on the TARDIS.

Whenever I put a new coop together I make sure that I have a good quality heavy weed fabric under the coop. This keeps mud from taking over the runs when it rains and gives a good base to lay sand in the pens. It also has the added benefit of keeping weeds from growing around the coop. It’s not anything that  has to be done by any means, it is just a little extra thing that I add for the comfort of my girls.

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Four hours later, construction of the TARDIS was complete. It stands at the highest of 6 feet. I can easily walk into the coop and have a little room to spare. We really like the walk-in design and I am sure they girls will too since we will be able to visit them in their coop. The walk-in design will also make it easier to clean, which my little Kuntry Klucker will be responsible for.

Now that the coop is constructed the fun begins. Like all my coops I make sure that I put a good layer of mulch around them. This keep mud and weeds down plus affords me the ability to plant herbs around the coop and pen. The herbs are two fold, one I use a lot of herbs in my cooking and since most bugs don’t like herbs they are natural deterrent keeping bugs away from my girls. Its not full proof but it does offer some deterrent to insects. That combined with keeping the coop and pen clean really goes a long way.

After enclosing the outdoor run area in chicken wire and a little white picket fence for decoration and laying mulch its ready to be chicken tested. The chicken wire is to keep the Big Girls out of the Silkie pens while keeping the Silkies contained in their run area. Since the TARDIS Crew is so much smaller than the Kuntry Klucker Crew I have to take precautions to reduce injury. The TARDIS Crew loves their new digs.

Looks like the 4 current residents love their new digs! This coop will house 9 Silkie Bantams. I have 4 right now, the other 5 will arrive in May. After they new clutch gets to be the size of these guys I will begin to introduce them to their new digs and TARDIS companions. The Bantam Boutique has new neighbors!!

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Enigma is not too fond of the neighbors yet. He is still trying to get his little mind wrapped around the fact that their is a new coop next door. But in the meantime its really funny watching him try to make since of it. I am sure that in a few weeks he will accept his new neighbors and enjoy the company next-door.

So once again the land scape of my backyard has changed. We are really excited about our new addition and the chicks to arrive in May. I will also be adding more chickens to the Bantam Boutique Crew as well. I have 4 Bantam Frizzle Cochins that will be added to the current residents of the Bantam Boutique. That will be a post to come later.

For now, the kid loves his TARDIS coop and the Silkie girls love their news digs.

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Welcome to the Coop-hood!! The TARDIS has landed!

 

Thanks for taking time to catch up with the girls and I. We have a lot of exciting things coming up in the next few months as we prepare for spring planting and a new batch of 9 chicks to arrive. We will catch up with you soon. Till then keep on crowing.

~ The Kuntry Klucker, Bantam Boutique, and TARDIS Crew ~

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Introducing the “Bantom Botique”

Spring has sprung, for backyard chicken keepers this means only one thing, Chicks!! That is right, the girls and I will have new additions to the backyard, allow me to introduce to you the Bantom Boutique.  The Bantom Boutique will house two new breeds, White Crested Polish Bantoms and White Silkie Bantoms. The girls and I have been very busy putting together the new coop and getting it painted and decorated in time for the new additions to arrive.  It has been a project that I have been working on for the past three months, I am so glad that it is finally finished. All we have to do now it wait for the peeping box to arrive in May. But for now, allow me to get you caught up on our little project here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm.

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I purchased the Bantom Boutique at my local Tractor Supply store. Since I am getting some fancy breeds I though that I should get a coop that matches the style of the tenants. The coop came in a huge box, actually so huge that I could not get it into the backyard. Instead I opened it up on the drive way and carried it piece by piece to the backyard for assembly. This is where the girls come in.

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Since they consider the backyard their territory anything that enters the backyard is put through a strict scrutiny (pecking) process. The Bantom Boutique was no acceptation. As the pieces started to collect in the backyard the girls got right to work pecking giving it their approval. For the assembly of the Bantom Boutique I did have some human help, my sons were a great help in the construction process.

We had a great time putting together the Bantom Boutique. The girls were very involved in the process as well. As we started to assemble all the random pieces propped against the fence the girls made sure that they got their say in the approval of the structure. Miss Sweet Pea in particular was of much help.

As the vague shape of a chicken coop started to emerge out of the random pieces the girls knew just what to do. Go in and check out the new neighbors digs! They inspected it inside and out giving it their stamp (peck) of approval.

Now that we finally had the Bantom Boutique completed, it was time to decorate! I painted the Bantom Boutique the classic red and white that all my coops dote. Out of the box it was a slate grey and white. Although pretty I prefer all my coops to have a uniformity, that being barn red and white. So once I got it situated the next step was the painting. For this I would not allow the girls to help me. I had to keep them in their pen while I was painting the Bantom Boutique. Paint is not good for chickens to consume or breath. They were upset with me but I had to put their safety first.

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Once it was dry, it was time for decorating and the coop-scaping. For this phase I had plenty of help or should I say “hen-derences”. Finally freed from their pen and eager to help, the girls got straight to work. I went to my local nursery and brought home several plants, bags of mulch, and a large bag of potting soil. Their first task was to taste all of the plants that I brought home. You see all of the plants in my backyard are edible by the girls. I do this so that I do not have to worry about the girls consuming something that could  hurt them. Whenever I bring in something new to plant in the backyard they are eager to taste it.

So, as I set my plants out and got my potting soil ready I had plenty of “hen-derences” helping me. On one side I had a few of the girls tasting the new neighbors plants, on the other side I had Miss Sweet Pea in the garden soil bag having a ball. You see chickens use dirt to dust bathe in, this keeps their feathers groomed and even wards off lice and mites.

Well, apparently potting soil makes for great dust bathing! As I was trying to get the girls on my one side from eating all my plants I had on the other side Miss Sweet Pea kicking all the potting soil out of the bag as she was dust bathing in it. It was really kind of funny. I regret that I was never able to snap any pictures of all the “help”, but it was really cute. I have planted flowers in the backyard before and never had this much help from the girls, so this is why I call them my “hen-derences”. We had a ball planting the flower and getting the Bantom Boutique ready for the chicks in May.

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I still have plans for one more coop in my backyard that will house Blue Orphingtons, but that is a project for another year. For now, the Bantom Boutique is our new addition. I will have plenty of pics in May when the chicks arrive that I will share with you all.

But before I go, I have some other exciting news. Miss Katie, our resident broody hen has gone broody again this year. This is so timely because I am hoping that she will adopt and brood this new batch of chicks for me. If not that is okay, I will simply set up my brooder and raise them till they are ready for the big outdoors. However, if she takes to the new chicks I will let her raise them in the backyard for me. I have placed her in the Bantom Boutique where the new chicks will live once they are able to be outside. She has made herself comfortable and is happily sitting on some ceramic eggs that I placed under her.

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This is the first time I have attempted to see if a broody hen will adopt chicks that she did not hatch. I have many friends that have had success with adoption. It all depends on the hen. Miss Katie is our tried and true momma. She has raised three other clutches for me and I look for her to adopt the chicks and raise them for me as well. Additionally, she is a very friendly broody. Many broody hens can be mean and aggressive. Miss Katie on the other hand is not. She has raised other clutches of chick that turned out to be very friendly. She will not only teach the chicks how to be chickens but also teach them to trust and be friendly towards me. I will make sure to post about my experience with this either good or bad.

That is all for now, thanks for stopping by and spending some time with the girls and I. Till next time keep on crowing!

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~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

 

Is it hard to raise Backyard Chickens?

Raising chickens is a fun and affordable hobby. Its called backyard chickens for a reason, this implies that one wants to raise a mini flock of chickens rather than a large operation. Now, don’t get me wrong, chicken math is a force of nature not to be taken lightly. But for the average backyard chicken enthusiast, keeping your flock at a manageable number is relatively easy. Its just takes the persistent enforcement of chicken birth control (aka. collecting eggs) and obtaining only a few number of chicks from reliable hatcheries. You can also ask one of your backyard chicken friends to hatch  you off a small starter flock. Other than that, keeping a small flock of backyard chickens is not inherently difficult.

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Chickens are very simple creatures, they do not demand a lot from their owners. Since chickens are very social animals they have plenty of company among their flock members. The needs of a chicken are simple. They need clean, fresh water daily. It does not need to be filtered or bottled but it does need to be fresh and clean daily. Simply filling up a clean water container every morning when letting the flock out of the coop is all this entails. They also need fresh and dry feed daily. It is always best to keep your feed in galvanized trash cans if you plan on keeping it outside. Not only will this keep your feed uncontaminated (from rats, coons and other wildlife) it will ensure that the feed will remain dry and thus not spoil. Chicken feed comes in large 25 to 50 pound bags, you will have enough feed to last a while depending on the size of your flock.  As you can see in the image below, I keep two galvanized trash cans outside of the pen, this is were I store the feed for the girls. Be warned, your chickens will very quickly  learn to associate the sound of the lids being removed from the cans as a makeshift dinner bell. My girls get very excited when they hear the all too familiar”clank” of the trash cans lids. I am suddenly surrounded by a group of girls eagerly anticipating its contents.

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Next, you will need a habitat. This is where a lot of chicken owners can be creative and inventive. You can do whatever you want to make your backyard chickens home personable to you, just make sure that is has a few very important qualities.

  1. Your chickens home needs to be large enough to accommodate the size of your birds as well as your flock.  A lot of coop descriptions will say that “this coop will fit 2-4 standard size birds”. What does that mean? Well chickens come in two sizes, standard or large fowl and bantam or miniature chickens. If you have 6 standard size birds you need to make sure that you choose a coop that can fit 6-8 standard size birds. Choosing a coop that fits less than that will cause stress in the flock. If the birds do not have ample room and feel over crowded many problems can result. Over mating of the hens by the rooster, cannabolism caused by pecking of flock mates, and of course illness due to the birds being under stress. So when choosing a coop, first know the size of your birds and based on the dimensions of the coop how many can fit comfortably.
  2. Your chickens home needs to be secure. This means not only does it need latches on the door to keep predators out, the coop also needs to have a pen if you choose to keep your girls in a pen vs free ranging. Most if not all coops bought in the stores usually come with an attached pen in its design. Make sure that the pen is enclosed with wire mesh that is galvanized with holes small enough to keep even the peskiest mouse out of your girls home.
  3. Your coop must be easy to clean. Most coops are designed with a drawer that can be pulled out from under the roosts to clean the dropping off from the previous night. Many chicken owner put pine shaving on this drawer to absorb moisture from the dropping and simply with gloves or a small hand shovel remove the dropping like you would clean a litter box. Either method is fine, just make sure the you clean the dropping out daily to keep flies and illness at bay.
  4. your coop must be draft free. When looking for or constructing a coop make sure that the coop has both ample ventilation while at the same time being draft free. It sounds like a double edged sword, I know. What this basically means is leave room at the top for air to escape while also protecting the birds from fridgid winter wind, rains, and other elements. Your coop does not need to be warm or heated. In fact, heat lamps are the number one cause of coop fires. Not only will a heat lamp fire kill your birds, coop fires can also damage other structures on your property including your home. Never use Heat lamps in coops, they are just too dangerous. Instead focus on keeping your chicken coop clean and dry. Chickens do not need heat, they come with down jackets factory installed and are well able to regulate their own body temperature given the right conditions, that being a coop that is clean, dry, and draft free. As long as your birds remain dry and protected from the wind and rain they will do just fine when it comes to surviving winter.
  5. The design of the coop. The design of chicken coops are endless. I have seen everything from little cottages to barn style chicken coops. Quite honestly, I think that picking out the perfect chicken coop is almost as fun as picking out what breed or breeds you want to raise. You don’t have to buy your coop prefab you can get plans off the internet and make your own from raw materials. Either way its up to you. We have done both. We made our first coop and pen from scratch. It was fun and we really enjoyed the process. The additional coops I bought as prefab kits that I put together.Both have advantages and disadvantages. The advantage of making your own coop is that you can make it as big as you want, the disadvantage is that it takes a while to construct and can be expensive. The advantage of prefab kit coops is that they come already made all you have to do is screw them together and you have a coop in about 45 minutes. The disadvantage is that you are limited by the designs that are available. Personally I like the prefab coops better. They are made with quality materials and are easy to maintain and clean. I cannot keep large numbers of birds in them so I usually have to get several but I don’t mind having to take care of more than one coop. Coop chores are so simple, more than one coop really does not make that much more work.

Here are a few pics of my coops. I currently have three and have plans to purchase one more. The first one is The Kuntry Klucker, this is the coop that hubby and I made from scratch. It took about 4 months and roughly $1000 from start to finish. This will house up to 20 standard size birds. The most I have ever had in this coop is 17. Even then they still had plenty of room.

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Next is Roy’s Roost, it is a prefab coop. It will house two standard size birds or 3 bantom size birds. I bough it for Roy as his hospital coop when he was sick. Since his passing its purpose still remains as my hospital coop. When I have a girl that needs separated from the flock due to injury or illness I place her in this coop. I can better monitor her eating and drinking habits as well as administer medication if needed. The patient will remain here till she can be returned to the flock.

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This last coop is Betsy’s Bliss. I bought this coop to serve as a broody coop. This is where I will house a broody momma as she sits on her nest. This allows the mamma hen some privacy while still allowing her to eat, drink, and dust bathe normally. When the chicks hatch both mamma and chicks are protected from predators and curious flock mates. It will house one standard size bird and a few chicks or two bantam size chickens.

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I have placed these two smaller kit coops in my spice garden. When not in use they serve a decorative accents in my garden. I purchased these two coops about two years ago. They have survived the elements and mother nature very well. In the fall I put a coat of wood protectant on them to protect them from the harsh elements of winter. If we have heavy snow or ice in the forecast I will put 6×8 tarps over the top of them just to give them a bit of extra protection. Other than their size, I really do not experience any different in their function  or durability. I am very pleased with these kit coops and will plan on purchasing more as my needs arise.

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Other than the basic needs of food, water, and housing chickens are very simple to raise. The only other thing I can suggest is to have a chicken first aid kit on hand. I have built up my first aid kit slowly over the years. Basically you will need items to treat a chicken that may have injuries or illness. When taken care of properly chickens do not encounter much illness. The most complicated condition I have ever had to deal with was when several of my girls coming down with Bumble foot. I have a blog post on Bumble foot for those who wish to learn how to affectively and simply treat this condition.

Your first aid kit should include basic items such as: epsom salts, rubbing alcohol, peroxide, cotton balls, triple antibiotic cream, salve, and vet wrap. Vet wrap is very handy because unlike a band-aid it will stick to itself making it ideal for animal use. I cannot tell you how many feet of vet wrap I have used throughout my years as a backyard chicken keeper.

My girls have never needed any antibiotic treatment. I am usually able to treat minor ailment with natural methods such as apple cider vinegar in the water, electrolytes, and chicken rx herbal drops. Should my girls ever develop an infection that needs antibiotic I would consult a vet to assist me. In my experience, given proper care my girls have never developed any conditions that I could not treat at home.

As for the cost of keeping backyard chickens, once you have their habitat purchased or constructed they are very affordable to maintain. My 10 girls will go through a 50 pound of feed in about a month. I find compared to a medium size dog chickens are much cheaper to keep. Additionally, for all your work and dedication they will give you something in return, a beautiful farm fresh egg. In my book a pet that makes me breakfast is worth its weight in gold.

Thanks for stopping by and spending time with the girls and I. As always if you have any questions please feel free to post in the comments. I will do my best to get back to you as soon as I can.

Thanks for visiting, the girls and I will see you soon.

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew~

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10 Things that I learned from My Hens

  1. Always greet the day with anticipation. Many great delicacies await.

2. Simplicity and a thankful heart are some of life’s greatest virtues.

hiding behind the water3. Bring up your young well. They are the next generation and the key to your legacy.

4. When getting into mischief always make sure you have a buddy. Partners in crime always have more fun.

5. Make sure that you leave a little something for those who care about you. Giving is always better than recieving.

6. Try to appreciate the season of winter. Although bleak, it prepares the ground for spring flowers and other delectables.

7. Tend your gardens well. A well groomed garden makes the heart sing.

8. Choose your flock wisely, they will be your groupies for life.

 

9. Make time for friends. Friends make the heart happy.

10. Above all, be like butterflies, they hold the key to true freedom.

 

Hens can teach you so much about the simple pleasures of life. They are simple creatures that require little. They are happiest when they are allowed to do what nature intended them to do. My girls are happy ladies and nothing delights me more than watching them do what bring delight to their hearts.

I hope you enjoyed this lesson on the simple pleasures of hens. They can teach us many things if we just take the time to watch and learn.

As always thanks for stopping by. Till next time, keep on crowing, see you soon!

~The Kuntry Klucker Crew~

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