They’re Here!!

It’s that time again!!! Chick days are alive and well here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm. The girls are about to get some new neighbors. These little ones are going to call the Bantom Boutique and the Tardis home.

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Last November I ordered 9 chicks for this springs clutch. I ordered 9 Silkies an 4 Frizzle Cochins, a total of 9. Unfortunately one of the little Silkies did not make it. Among the surviving members are 2 Buff Silkies, 2 Black Silkies, and 4 Black Fizzle Cochins which will be added to The Kuntry Klucker Farm.

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For my brooder I use a puppy play pen and for the heat source I use a EcoGlow heater. The puppy play pen work very well as a brooder because it has raised sides which keep the shaving mess to a minimum and a closed top which keep the chicks from flying the coop. As they age they reach the flying phase which can frustrate many chick owners as they try to keep the chicks in the brooder. This product, although made for dogs doubles as a great brooder, all issues are covered in one simple setup.

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As dictated by tradition, day three of their life here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm is picture day! Chicks only have their soft downy appearance for about three days, after that they start to feather out and enter what I like to call the ugly duckling phase. So as always, I grab my camera and snap pics on the third day. I will share some of these with you below.

The 4 Frizzle Cochins will be joining the Bantom Boutique Crew when they are big enough to move out doors. The BB Crew will be known as the “freaky feather bunch”. When the Frizzle cochins feather out they will have a bit of a frizzle feather appearance, hence the name “Frizzle”. They will fit right in with the Polishes who have a bit of a frizzle appearance with their white crown feathers.

The Buff and Black Silkies will of course be joining the TARDIS crew which consists of 3 White Silkies and 1 Black Silkie. Currently I have one of the white Silkies sitting on a clutch consisting of 3 ceramic eggs. She went broody about 3 week ago, I plan to allow her to raise the 4 Silkie’s chicks for me and introduce them to the existing TARDIS Crew when she feels the time is right. I will of course chronicle this adventure for you as Miss Donna raises a clutch of 4 Silkie chicks. I had a successful adoption by Miss Katie our resident Buff Orphington Momma Hen last year. She did a great job in bringing up Aphridite for me. I hope to have the same success with Miss Donna. I will have a post about the adoption and my method coming soon.

But for now, we welcome the newest additions to the Kuntry Klucker Farm where chickens live like Kings, living the sweet life.

Here are few of the pics from our morning photo shoot. Baby pics!!

Stay tuned for a post on chick adoption by an existing broody. Till then, keep on clucking, the girls and I will see you soon.

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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It’s Tilling Day!!

Welcome back everyone!! Today is the day that the girls look forward to the most, tilling day. For those who don’t understand what all the excitement is about, allow me to explain. Tilling means two things, one the start of the next growing season and two, worms!! I am more excited about planting crops while the girls are more excited about the worms and bugs.

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I have lots of help here on the Kuntry Klucker Farm. My hubby willingly tills the garden for me while the girls enthuiastically follow him gobbling up any worms and bugs that the tiller disturbs. Its a big deal here at the farm. Below I will chronical the events of the evening.

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The tiller is awoken from its long winters slumber in the garden shed and brought to the backyard. Now most animals when they see something as scary looking as a tiller coming into the living quarters they respond in sheer panic, the girls not so much. The girls (with 8 years now under their wings) know exactly the bounty that shortly awaits them when the tiller makes it annual apperance. They flock to the tiller following the user to the garden where they line up for the imminent buffet.

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As the tiller turns the soil, worms and other delectables come to the surface which the girls delightfully gobble up. Now the rules of this chicken game is to be the chicken right behind the tiller. The hen that is closest to the tiller gets the worms first. Its a literal game of “the early bird gets the worm”. As you can probably suspect, there are squabbles for the first place position behind the tiller, but that’s all part of the fun.

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As the garden is further tilled the worms are more abundant so being the first hen in line does not matter as much. As the tiller makes its way around the garden, so do the girls. Instead of a line of hungry chickens, we then have circles of worm inspectors following the tiller. The human perspective of the excitement that the girls expereince is absolutely hilarious. We get as much joy out of watching them getting the worms as they do in getting the worms. Owning chickens is so much fun, this is just one of the delightful aspects that chickens bring to the backyard homestead.

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When the tiller has done its job and is returned to its place in the garden shed, the girls still work for a while longer. They will continue to further till the soil for me for the next several l weeks. Once the last frost has passed it will be time to plant the crops and the growing season begins. The girls will continue to work in the garden all summer long patrolling the plants for bugs and turning the soil as they search for delicious worms to feast on.

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The Bantam Botique and TARDIS crew on the other hand are new to all of this excitement. This is their first experience with the tiller, this time last year they were still eggs not yet hatched. Enigma and the crew are not sure what to make of the tiller. But if life can teach a chicken anything its to love the worm god, AKA the tiller.

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That is all the excitement for now, the girls will be busy the next several weeks helping us prepare for planting season. Thanks for stopping by, the girls and I will be back soon with a post on the new arrivals. New chicks will arrive May 11!! We here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm are anxiously awaiting their arrival.

See you soon, till then keep on crowing.

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Spring has Sprung!!

Spring has finally sprung here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm. The days are finally getting longer and the weather is starting to warm up nicely. Along with longer days and warmer weather comes flowers and bugs. The girls in particular are excited about the bugs whereas I am a bit more excited about the flowers. But no matter the excitement whether it be over bugs or flowers spring means one thing, planting season!

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Things are about to get real busy here at the Kuntry Kluckr Farm and the girls are very excited. First we took the plastic down from around the coops. I put this up in late fall to protect the girls from the chilly winter winds and participation. The plastic helps to keep the coop and pens warm and dry while keeping rain, snow and ice out. All the girls appreciate the added protection and consequently spend more time in the coop and pen where it is warm and dry as opposed to outside. But as the weather warms the girls spend less time in the pen and more time in the backyard doing what chickens do, hunting and pecking.

After taking down the winter protection from around the coops it was coop cleaning day. I deep clean the coops once a year usually in the spring after the winter season. I completely wash them inside and out along with the pen, shoveling all the old sand out of the coops and replacing it with new fresh sand. Since the girls are out in the yard a lot more I can finally prepare the coops for the spring and summer seasons. Now that coop cleaning day is done its time to start getting ready for planting season.

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While I am busy planning the gardens for the upcoming growing season, the girls are busy doing their share of work tilling them for me. All winter long I dump shaving from the coops on the gardens where it decomposes conditioning the soils in preparation for spring planting. The girls after a long winter of being cooped up due to the winter temps and weather enthusiastically get to work. They turn over all the shaving in the gardens as they search for worms and other delectables. In the process their efforts till the gardens working the shaving into the soil as they search for bugs and worms. Soon it will be time for the tiller which they thoroughly enjoy. Turning over the soil in preparation for planing lends to many worms to enjoy. When the tiller come to the backyard they know the banquet that awaits.

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Finally, after spending the winter in the warm dry coop and pen, its time to catch up with old friends at the other end of the yard. The Bantam Boutique and Tardis Crew are doing well. They too are appreciating the longer days and warmer weather. The Silkies are busy finding worms and bugs in the mulch that surrounds their coop while the Bantam Crew does the same. The sheer joy that is expressed upon the unearthing of a juicy worm or fresh bug is nothing less than exilerating in the world of a chicken.

As the flocks once again greet each other and the increasing warmth from the sun all is blissful here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm. Soon we will have crops in the ground and berries on the bushes. The girls will dilligently work to rid my garden plants of bugs while getting a bit of the spoil in the process. Good times are ahead as we plow away at the coming growing season.

The girls and I have more exciting news to share with you here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm. I have ordered some new recruits, chicks will be arriving in early May! We are so excited to welcome these new little members and eagerly await their arrival. I will of course have a post detailing the additions to the Kuntry Klucker Farm crew.

Till then, thanks for stopping by we will see you again soon!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

Prefab vs. Hand Built Coops

Hi everyone, this post is going to be a little bit different than my normal posting. I have received a lot of questions from my readers inquiring what chicken coops are best, prefab coops or hand build coops. For those who are not familiar with what a prefab coop is allow me to explain. When I refer to prefab coops I am talking about coops that you see in farm stores, such as Tractor Supply or Rural King just to name a few. They come in boxes and require assembly which is very simple only needing a screw driver and a little elbow grease.

Many chicken keepers do not like them and recommend that new comers build their own coop. I for one am of a differing opinion. I built my first coop and I added 4 prefab coops later. I will say that I love the prefab coops and that they make very viable options for those who cannot build a coop for various reasons whether they be financial, physical limitation, or conceptual reasons. Woodworking and carpentry is not for everyone, it is hard work and can be very expensive and dangerous especially if you have never worked with wood before. So to those who want chickens and hear the “if you don’t build the coop its not a coop” rhetoric this post if for you. This is the story of my journey in both building a coop and owning prefabs. I hope that it helps.

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I built my first coop, the Kuntry Klucker. I love my big coop but I will say it was the hardest most dangerous project that I undertook. I was new to chickens and followed the advice of more experienced keepers, one of which was don’t buy a prefab coop build your own. Not knowing much this is what I did. I found through this endeavor that I have no business using power tools. I nearly killed myself twice and spent $1500 more than I had intentionally set out to spend. After I cut the wood too short or at wrong angels it got expensive. I realized that this was really bad advice that I followed from more experienced chicken keepers. I had never built anything before, so this was my first and last experience with wood working and carpentry in general.

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So how did I come to love prefab coops. Well, as the saying goes you cannot have just one. I feel in love with chickens and wanted more. I knew from my past experience that building my coop was a suicide mission so I looked elsewhere. I began to entertain the thought of prefab coops against the better judgement of other poultry keepers. The fact was simple, I can not build a coop so I had to seek out other options.

To start I read reviews, most will say that it looks good but the quality is poor. This is a general across the board review that you will see for a prefab coop. Don’t let this bother you, the coops given a little love will do just fine. Anyway, knowing this I ordered one with a plan in mind. When it arrived I put it together and was actually shocked at how well it was actually made. Drawing from my experience from my coop building disaster I updated the hardware cloth, updated the latches, and gave the wood a good coat of barn paint followed by a good water seal. The results were stunning!!! No only did I not kill myself building the “kit coop”, all I needed was a screwdriver inserted of a power saw. But after I made my adjustments is held up well, and I mean well. I live in the steamy south in East Tennessee. We get hot summers with lots of humidity, nasty spring storms, and ice in the winter. Mother Nature throws it all at us. Through this my prefab coops have held up very well. I do touch up the paint about every other year, the hardware cloths and latches are still fine.

After my experience with my first prefab coop which now has 5 years under its belt, I ordered more as my flocks grew. I now have 5 coops currently in operation, 4 of them are prefab coops. I have not had any predators get into my prefab coop, nor have I had any problems with the wood rotting (hence the paint and water seal). The Roofs hold up well and the durability of the structures have withstood everything mother nature has thrown at it thus far. I can honestly say that it would take a disasterous weather event to tear them down such a tornado or derecho. But if I get a tornado here I will have much more to worry about than just damage to my prefab coops. Additionally, I have them insured under my homeowners property damage clause. I will just put them in with all the other things we need replaced should we have to deal with a disastrous weather event.

So this is my story, I learned from experience that building your own coop as many suggest is just not feasible for everyone. I did it and nearly killed my self and I will never build one from scratch again. I have enough experience with prefab coops to honestly recommend them as a viable options for others who cannot or do not know how to built a chicken coop. They are a very good option. I will say that I will only get mine from Tractor Supply or a local co-op. Reason being… if it arrived damaged (so far none of mine have) they will replace or exchange it for me. If I order from Amazon I might be a bit screwed there. That would be my only advice. Prefab coops are great, but get it from TSC, Rural King, or local co op that sales them. If you have problems you can get help.

I am a small voice with respect to prefab chicken coops in particular. But I like to think that my experience and opinions will help others understand that there are other options and that prefab coops can make great homes for your chickens.

 

Thanks for reading. The girls and I will be back soon. Till next time keep on crowing.

~ The Kuntry Klucker, Bantam Botique, and TARDIS Crew ~

The TARDIS has landed!!

Hello again everyone!!! The girls and I have been doing well, trying to survive mud season here on the Kuntry Klucker farm. That annoying season between winter and spring, with all the rain we have had it is hard to keep up. Hopefully here in a few weeks we will start to dry out and begin getting the gardens ready for spring planting. In the meantime though we have been up to another coop project. That is right, the Kuntry Klucker Crew once again gets new neighbors. Allow me to introduce to you the TARDIS! For those of you who are Dr. Who fans you know very well what the TARDIS is. For those not so familiar, it stands for Time And Dimension In Space. On our farm here its Time And Dimension In Space chicken style!

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This coop is for my son. I have two little Kuntry Kluckers one of which has been bitten by the addictive chicken bug. We are huge Dr. Who fans so we looked around to find a coop that could best resemble a TARDIS. We lucked out and found this beautiful design at our local Tractor Supply. The girls of this coop will all be named after Dr. Who companions, the boys will be named Strax and Hydroflax. The Kuntry Klucker Crew as always are very curious about anything that comes into the backyard the Bantam Boutique crew as well. So once again we add one more coop to our little coop neighborhood here at the Kuntry Klucker farm.

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This was by far the most complex of coops that we have put together. It took three of us working for 4 hours to finally bring the TARDIS to life. It is a very solid and heavy coop so I am confident that like the Bantam Boutique, it will handle whatever mother nature throws its way. So, once again the girls get to watch the construction of yet another coop in their coop-hood paradise.

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The box containing the coop was massive. It took up the entire bed of a large pickup truck to get it here. Since this coop weighs upwards of 150 pounds, we opened the box on the drive way and carried it to the backyard piece by piece for construction. Due to the enormity of this coop I had to keep the Kuntry Klucker and the Bantam Botique Crew in their pens for their safely. From inside their pens there were very attendive to what was going on around them. We were serenaded by Enigma who through his crowing let us know that we were being heavily supervised.

Once we hauled the coop piece by piece to the backyard construction began on the TARDIS.

Whenever I put a new coop together I make sure that I have a good quality heavy weed fabric under the coop. This keeps mud from taking over the runs when it rains and gives a good base to lay sand in the pens. It also has the added benefit of keeping weeds from growing around the coop. It’s not anything that  has to be done by any means, it is just a little extra thing that I add for the comfort of my girls.

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Four hours later, construction of the TARDIS was complete. It stands at the highest of 6 feet. I can easily walk into the coop and have a little room to spare. We really like the walk-in design and I am sure they girls will too since we will be able to visit them in their coop. The walk-in design will also make it easier to clean, which my little Kuntry Klucker will be responsible for.

Now that the coop is constructed the fun begins. Like all my coops I make sure that I put a good layer of mulch around them. This keep mud and weeds down plus affords me the ability to plant herbs around the coop and pen. The herbs are two fold, one I use a lot of herbs in my cooking and since most bugs don’t like herbs they are natural deterrent keeping bugs away from my girls. Its not full proof but it does offer some deterrent to insects. That combined with keeping the coop and pen clean really goes a long way.

After enclosing the outdoor run area in chicken wire and a little white picket fence for decoration and laying mulch its ready to be chicken tested. The chicken wire is to keep the Big Girls out of the Silkie pens while keeping the Silkies contained in their run area. Since the TARDIS Crew is so much smaller than the Kuntry Klucker Crew I have to take precautions to reduce injury. The TARDIS Crew loves their new digs.

Looks like the 4 current residents love their new digs! This coop will house 9 Silkie Bantams. I have 4 right now, the other 5 will arrive in May. After they new clutch gets to be the size of these guys I will begin to introduce them to their new digs and TARDIS companions. The Bantam Boutique has new neighbors!!

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Enigma is not too fond of the neighbors yet. He is still trying to get his little mind wrapped around the fact that their is a new coop next door. But in the meantime its really funny watching him try to make since of it. I am sure that in a few weeks he will accept his new neighbors and enjoy the company next-door.

So once again the land scape of my backyard has changed. We are really excited about our new addition and the chicks to arrive in May. I will also be adding more chickens to the Bantam Boutique Crew as well. I have 4 Bantam Frizzle Cochins that will be added to the current residents of the Bantam Boutique. That will be a post to come later.

For now, the kid loves his TARDIS coop and the Silkie girls love their news digs.

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Welcome to the Coop-hood!! The TARDIS has landed!

 

Thanks for taking time to catch up with the girls and I. We have a lot of exciting things coming up in the next few months as we prepare for spring planting and a new batch of 9 chicks to arrive. We will catch up with you soon. Till then keep on crowing.

~ The Kuntry Klucker, Bantam Boutique, and TARDIS Crew ~

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Chicken Math!!!!

Hello fellow peeps! Sorry its been a while since I posted on here, but I have been down with a bug, a bug fellow chicken keepers are well aware of. The dreaded bug of chicken MATH!!! That is right, I have been stuck with the chicken math bug. Now for you readers not familiar with the chicken math plague, allow me to describe the depths of this hypnotic illness.

You see as chicken keepers we do not count our chickens like most normal people would count jelly beans, change or marbles. You see no real method of counting works when it comes to chickens. If you see 1 + 1 you will automatically say well that equals two. Not so for us chicken owners as we count our chickens. We say, “2 chickens plus 4 chickens that would be about 5 chickens or so”. You see we don’t really want to admit how many chickens that we have because then we would realize that we have too many. So we use the system of Chicken Math. It’s an approximate number of chickens that we might have minus a few.

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Its a rather contagious bug, especially around Thanksgiving. While most people are out buying a turkey and the trimmings for a Thanksgiving dinner or staking out their prey in the form of stores for black friday deals. We chicken owners are trying to beat the rush for ordering chicks for the next spring. If you thought that black friday lines were an intense crowd, you have not seen chicken owners sitting by the computers anxiousally waiting for the stroke of mid night to order chicks. If you are into rare breeds this intensidty is even worse. There are only a few being hatched so you have to make sure that your order goes though, first and fast!

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Anyway, back to the chicken math. Here is how it works in my case. Let’s see, I have 9 or so big girls in the Kuntry Klucker and I guess, 8 or so in the Bantom Botique. Using the concept of Chicken Math that would be about 10 chickens, I have more than enough room for more.

So according to chicken math I don’t have enough and onto ordering I go. So instead of rushing to the stores like most red blooded American’s, I am at home down with the chicken math bug. What am I doing in particular? I am going through all the available breeds, trying to decide which breeds I want to bring to the Kuntry Klucker Farm next spring.

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After much thought, debating with myself, and running the numbers of chicken math again and again,  I have decided to order 9 new chicks for next year.

We are so excited!! Here is rap sheet for next year’s chicks.

2 Bantom Black Silkies (1 male and 1 female)

3 Bantom Buff Silkies (1 Male and 2 Females)

4 Bantom Cochin Frizzle ( all females)

I wanted to get another White Crested Polish but I was too late and they were all gone. Even so, I ended up with quite a list for next year. I have chosen the hatch date of May 7, so that means by May 8th or 9th I will be a chick ma ma again.

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I cannot wait for my peeping package to arrive at my local post office and start the adventure all over again. Ordering chicks is so much fun and the method of Chicken Math makes it possible.

What am I going to do with all these chicks you may be asking? Well, I plan to add another chicken coop and place it in the spice garden with Roy’s Roost and Betsy’s Bliss. I have room for one more coop there. I plan to house all the Silkies in this coop. In the Bantom Botique I plan to integrate the 4 Bantom Cochin Frizzles with Enigma and the While Crested Polish Girls.

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I want to eventually get all the Silkies into a coop of their own. They will then roam the spice garden and tend that garden for me. Since Silkies have feathers on the feet they are not as destructive as the non-feathered footed breeds. That means that will at most turn the mulch and keep the bugs away in my spice garden. They will be the perfect addition to that garden.

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The Black Cochin Frizzles will make a great addition to the Bantom Botique. If you remember, Enigma was a little hatchery mix up last year. He was supposed to be a White Crested Polish Male. Since he is the only cochin on my farm here I wanted to get some girls that are his breed. So I will take the Silkies out of the Bantom Botique move them into the coop that I will place in my spice garden and then replace them with the Cochin Frizzles in the Bantom Botique.

In the end, once I get things all said and done the Kuntry Klucker farm here will be complete. If I get a bad case of the Chicken Math bug next spring I may order a few more. But for now, I think that my Chicken Math bug has run its course.

Thanks for dropping by and checking up on our goings on here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm. The girls are doing great, weathering the winter weather well. We have had some snow which they are not thrilled about, but like always they make the best of if it.

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Till next time, the girls and I wish you a Merry Cluckmas and a Happy New Year!!!

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~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Getting ready for Old Man Winter

 

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Sorry it has been a while since I posted. I am doing fine for those who messaged me in concern. I appreciate it, we have just been busy with fall and now getting ready for the holiday’s that are right around the corner. The Kuntry Klucker and Bantam Boutique are also ready for the upcoming winter season. A few days ago we winterized the coops and got them ready for the cold weather that will come our way soon. As you might have guessed by the title of this post, I will chronical how we here at the Kuntry Klucker farm prepare the coops for winter. I get a lot of questions from fellow chicken keepers on how to protect their flocks from the winter weather, I hope that this post offers some help and guidance in that area of winter care. So without further ado, lets dig into how to prepare your flock for winter.

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First and foremost chickens do not need a heater or heat lamp in the coops during the cold winter season. Actually not only are heat lamps huge fire hazards in chicken coops, that can actually make it harder for the chickens to regulate their body temperates. As the seasons change and cooler weather starts to take over chickens grow a down coat under their feathers, the same down coats that are sold in stores. Chickens by nature are little furnaces and are more than able to keep warm during the winter. A chickens average body temperature is about 109 degrees F so you can see that the cold temperates are not so much of a concern to them. Given that, I will tell you want I do for my girls to help them weather the winter well.

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Since chickens are naturally able to tolerate very cold temperatures I focus more on keeping the coop and pen dry. Cold temperatures are not so much of a problem for chickens but getting wet is a different story all together. So to protect them from the rain, snow, and ice I wrap the pens in an industrial plastic sheeting. This serves two purposes, one it keeps the rain and now out of the pens, and two it protects the girls from the wicked cold winter winds that can accompany the winter season.

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I wrap the pen completely in the plastic, only leaving a small potion open to allow fresh air to flow without allowing the winter winds to chill the girls.

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The girls are very thankful for the wind and water breaks that the plastic provides. During the coldest of winter days I will not allow them outside due to the possibility of getting chilled if the wind is rather nasty that day. Of course if its raining it will be a inside day for the girls. Since the ground seems to stay constantly moist or frozen during the winter I move a sandbox into the coop to offer them dry sand to dust bathe in. I also hang in their pen a chicken swing to offer some fun on the cold blustery winter days.

During the cold winter days or days where the weather is poor they prefer to stay in their pen to stay dry and thus warm. The plastic also keeps the winter winds out so thus the girls stay nice and warm. They don’t mind to stay in their pen, they have plenty of things to do to keep them occupied. During the winter I will also make them some treats to peck at and also aid in their entertainment. They over winter very well with nothing more than industrial plastic to shield them form the winter elements.

The Bantam Botique also gets the same first class winter care as the Kuntry Klucker girls receive. I wrap their entire pen in plastic to accomplish the same winter care as I for for the Kuntry Klucker. Only, since this is the Bantam Boutique Crew’s first winter they are not so sure of the plastic. Enigma in particular is quite entertaining as the crows every time the wind rattles the plastic. Next winter this will all be routine, but for this season their response is quite hilarious.

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I am sure that they appreciate the dry and warm environment that the plastic sheeting provides, but still they are a hoot. I place sand in the run of the Bantam Botique to allow me to clean out the poop with ease and also gives the Bantam Boutique Crew substrate to dust bathe in. The Kuntry Klucker has a dirt floor so that is why I add a sand box during the winter months. They Bantam Botique does not have the room for a sand box so I just put sand on the floor of their pen to achieve that same objective. The crew loves the sand and I like how easy it is the clean. Because I shelter the pen the sand always stay dry, manageable, and clean all winter long.

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So to answer the question about winter care for chickens I leave this advice. Do not use heat lamps, they are dangerous and with shavings in the coop they provide prime kindling for a disastrous coop fire. I allow the girls to use what nature provided them to keep warm and just supplement them with a dry and clean coop and pen. By using inexpensive plastic sheeting that I get at Tractor Supply for under $20, I offer them a comfortable overwintering experience. Chickens are made to live outside and weather quite well, they just need a clean dry place to call home. This is my 7th winter with the Kuntry Klucker girls and the first with the Bantam Botique Crew, over my past winters I have had a very happy and healthy flock.

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And what cozy warm winter coop wouldn’t be complete without a little festivity. Every year I string lights around the interior and exterior of the Kuntyr Klukcer in exception of Christmas and Santa coming to town. The lights offer the girls a little extra light in the evenings and I love to see the coop lit up with the lights of the season.

That is all for now. Till next time thanks for stopping by and spending a little time with the girls and I. We will be back soon with another entertaining post about life here on the Kuntry Klucker Farm.

As always, thanks for reading and keep on crowing

~ The Kuntry Klucker and Bantam Boutique Crew ~

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Standing in the Shadow of the Moon

Hi Everyone, welcome back to the Kuntry Klucker Farm. Today the girls experienced an astronomical event that has captured the attention of the nation. At 2:30 pm this afternoon the sky darkened in the sky over our little farm here. I set up time lapse cameras on both coops and captured their reaction to evening setting in on their afternoon. I am not able to post those videos here due to platform issues right now, if you want to see them you can catch them on my Facebook page, the link is in the “contacts” section of my page.

So without further ado, allow me to tell you how the girls took to the sky darkening during their afternoon. As they were enjoying their day of hunting and pecking in the gardens something spectacular was about to unfold over their heads. As the sky slowly started to darken they did take notice to the early approach of evening. I could tell that they were starting to wind things up for the day. As they continued to graze in the backyard their heads looked around trying to see if everyone else was getting ready for bed. As they continued to peck at the ground more and more of the girls looked up to see what everyone else was doing. They seemed to look to each other as if there is some kind of que they were waiting for. The pure confusion as they stood it the shadow of the moon was nothing less than entertaining. Sadly, the totality did not last long enough for them to actually roost but they did make their way to the pen and got their last sip of water and bite of feed before they would go up the latter for bed. I wished that totally would have lasted a bit longer but it was funny watching them be rather confused as to why bedtime was coming so early.

Below are two photos taken from my time lapse videos that I took recording their response to the eclipse. As you can see it got quite dark for a few moments, but not long enough for them to make their way up the latter to the coop. Instead they just froze in place as all of a sudden darkness fell on them as they were doing their rounds in the garden searching for delicious bugs to dine on.

Their response to the eclipse was that of dumfounded confusion as evening came on so suddenly that they did not have much time to really react. I was hoping that they would go to roost just to have the sun come out again to finish their day. Although I did not get the pics of the girls that I would have liked to had I did get some good pics of the Eclipse. Below is a chronological order of the Moon over taking the Sun.

Thanks for stopping by and spending a little time with the girls and I. Till next time, take care and keep on crowing.

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

 

Kuntry Klucker Crew Meets Bantam Boutique Crew

Hi everyone! Welcome back to the Kuntry Klucker farm. Tonight the Kuntry Klucker Crew and the Bantam Boutique Crew were formerly introduced to each other. Up till know I have kept the Bantam Boutique and the Kuntry Klucker crew seperated from each other. The girls are getting used to the Bantam Boutique Crew in their living space so I thought the time was right for a formal backyard introduction. In the post I will take you through the introductions as the two flocks meet each other.

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As typical for most social engagements, hors d’oeuvres or appetizers always make things run a bit smoother, the girls are no different. So to help make the situation as relaxing as possible, I spread some scratch or chicken candy out for both flocks. I let the Bantam Boutique crew out of their pen and allowed them to forage for the scratch in their outdoor enclosure as the Kuntry Klucker girls also foraged for their portions of chicken crack on the other side of their fence.

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The meeting went very smoothly, the big girls completely ignored the Bantam Boutique Crew. Althoug this sounds rude, its actually a good thing in the chicken world, this is what you want to happen. What it means is that the Kuntry Klucker girls have become comfortable with the Bantam Botique Crew being in their living space. At some point I would like to let both flocks out in the backyard and have peace and harmony among all the flock members.

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But before I do so, I need to make completely sure that the Kuntry Klucker girls no longer  see the Bantam Boutique Crew as intruders in their environment. The girls know that the Bantam Boutique Crew is there but up till know they have been in their pen to protect them from the big girls picking on them. When the Bantam Boutique Crew was first placed in their outdoor home the girls were very curious and spent many hours and days circling the pent trying to get to them. As time has gone on they are now comfortable with the Bantam Boutique Crew because they no long pay them any attention. As far as they Kuntry Klucker Crew is concerned, the Bantam Boutique Crew are just apart of the landscape.

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Once I saw this in the Kuntry Klucker Crew’s behavior I knew that the time was right for a formal backyard meet and greed session. I will allow the two flocks to be near each other like this for the next few weeks. At some point I am hoping to allow both flocks to free range in the backyard, but I cannot do this till I know that the big girls no long see the Bantam Boutique Crew as intruders.

It takes time, but slowly with constant protected interaction we will get to the point where both the Bantam Boutique and Kuntry Klucker Crew will happily coexist. Till then due to the size difference between the two flocks I have to proceed slowly till the time is right to allow the Bantam Boutique Crew into the yard with the big girls.

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All in all, I am very pleased how well this meet and greet session went. I was expecting the big girls to try to breach the barrier to get to the Bantam Boutique Crew on the other side. No only did this no happen, the Kuntry Klucker girls could care less about the presence of the Bantam Boutique Crew. I am confident that in a few short months I will have my backyard teaming with the two flocks happily coexisting. A peaceful flock is what every backyard chicken keeper wants.

Next time I will be back with a very interesting post. As many of you know a solar eclipse is expected to transit the United States on August 21st. I am thrilled to say that our property is directly in the shadow of totality. I plan to observe the girls behavior as the solar eclipse passes over the Kuntry Klucker Farm. I am sure that they will be very confused as it starts to get dark in the middle of the afternoon. I plan to catch their behavior in pictures and on time lapse video as they go to roost under the shadow of the solar eclipse. Check back soon after the solar eclipse and I will have a post dedicated to the girls reaction to the sky darkening at mid day. I am sure that they will be a hoot.

Till next time, take care, look to the skies and enjoy the passing butterflies.

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Little Hatchery Mixup

Hello again Kuntry Klucker fans. I promised in my last post that I would be sharing an update about the Bantom Boutique Gang. Well, here they are pretty much full grown and doing great! The Bantom Boutique Crew are well, bantam chickens which is another word for “miniature” chickens in the chicken world. But don’t let their small stature fool you, there is a lot of chicken attitude stuffed in those small packages. Starting with my little “hatchery mixup”.

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When I ordered my chicks from the hatchery I ordered two breeds, Silkies and White Crested Polishes. Well I had a little hitchhiker that was neither a Silkie nor a Polish. He was what I named my little mystery chick. I had planned on naming all my Polish girls after Greek Goddesses and my Polish Rooster Apollo. Well, things did not go as planned and have changed just a bit. Allow me to let you in on the identity of my little mystery chick.

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Everyone, meet Enigma! Enigma like the rest of the Bantam Botique Crew is a bantam, so they have size in common and that is just about it. Enigma has grown up to be a beautiful Motted Cochin, with a sweetest personality.

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Enigma is a rooster and has started to crow in the mornings when I greet them to let them out of the coop to start their new day. So, my plan to name all my polish girls after Greek Goddesses has changed slightly. I do have three polishes, two girls named Athena and Aphrodite, and a Polish rooster named Apollo. Since I had a little surprise in my batch of chicks I though the best name for the little one was Enigma. It would work for both a hen or rooster and is the perfect name since his identity was a bit of a, well an Enigma.

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Enigma as I have already mentioned has the sweetest personality. He is the alpha rooster, (that means rooster in command) of the Bantam Boutique Crew. He takes care of the ladies talks to them and tries to find them treats to eat. He is the first out of the coop in the morning and the last in the evening. Good roosters at times can be hard to find, I am blessed and thrilled to have him apart of my flock here at the Kuntry Klucker Farm. He is a delight to interact with and his plumage is very striking. Although he stands out among the Silkies and Polishes he is a beautiful addition due to his motted feather pattern.

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In the evenings when I let the Bantam Boutique Crew out for some scratch and play time, Enigma does his best to keep watch for the girls as they hunt and peck for bugs. Although originally a unexpected hitchhiker in my order of chicks, I am thrill to have him. I am glad that Enigma found his way into my order, he was destined to be the king of the Bantam Boutique Crew.

That is all I have for now, thanks for taking the time to catch up with the girls and I. Till next time, take care and keep crowing.

~ The Bantam Boutique Crew~

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