My Favorite Rooster Breeds

When acquiring a backyard chicken flock, most people chose a flock of ladies. But for those who want a rooster or two but are apprehensive as to which bread to choose, this post is for you.

My flock total clocks in at around 50, 30 or so hens and around 20 gents. The majority of my gents are broken up into four bachelor pens. A bachelor pen is a coop/pen assigned to just roosters. There are no ladies with the gents in their bachelor digs. Contrary to prevailing opinion, roosters can and do cohabitate well together. But there are some tricks to it. To learn about bachelor pens chick here . The rest of the gents are broken up amongst the coops that contain the ladies. I have three large coops that house my girls, within each of these pens I have two roosters. These gents care for and protect the ladies while they are out in the backyard free ranging. That means on any given day when the ladies are outside, I have 6 roosters in the yard with them.

For anyone who associates roosters with the nasty, blood thristy and aggressive barnyard bird stereotype, you may be thinking, that’s a lot of testosterone to have running around uncontained. Or is it?

Roosters unfortunately fall prey to a negative stereotype however, in reality they are not as aggressive as many think. Many people think roosters are as bad to the bone as they come, I beg to differ. Have you ever met a broody hen?

The roosters of yesteryear that haunt the dreams of those who have had negative encounters with them are often plagued by the game cock or other game birds. Yes, those guys can be a bit high strung and aggressive. However, due to the variety of breeds available the majority of roosters today are very docile and calm. Gone are the days of your grandparents flock which contained the rooster that starred in your nightmares. Many people today keep chickens for fun and eggs. Although some keep chicken for meat the majority of keepers are hobby enthusiasts. Thus, the breeds available today are suited for these purposes. That being said, below I will detail my favorite rooster breeds and why. So without further ado, let’s begin.

Buff Orphington:

The first stud that I will present for condiseration is the Orphington. My very first rooster was Roy, he was my first introduction to the worth and value of a rooster to a flock. Orphingtons as a breed are known as the “Golden Retrievers” of the chicken world. Their demeanor is calm, friendly, and low key. They are big balls of feathers, looking bigger than they actually are. Roy was much the same. He had a job to do and took it seriously but he was a gently giant. In my presence he was very calm and relaxed. He would beg me for treats that he could then distribute to his ladies. He was in one word a gentlemen. One day I witnessed his heroic efforts to save my girls from a hawk. He was prepared to lay down his life for his ladies until I heard his frantic call and came to his rescue. Had I not heard his cry that day I hate to think what I would have come home to. Lucky I was home and chased the hawk off of him. He made a full recover from his injuries and lived on several more years as the decorated protector of the flock. He passed away several years ago. I never thought I would miss a rooster so much. He taught me a lot about chickens and about the sacrificial nature of a rooster. Ever since Roy I have fallen in love with roosters. They are today one of my favorite creatures worthy of all the respect and admiration they deserve.

Cochin:

The next stud to introduce you to is Enigma. Enigma is a Motted Cochin Bantam. Like the Orphingtons, Cochins are also big balls of feathers. The cochin is a very docile and friendly breed. They girls make excellent mothers and the gents make excellent roosters. No bigger than he is, Enigma has established himself as the alpha rooster of the chicken yard, all the other guys answer to him. He is a very sweet rooster and takes very good care of his girls. He is calm around humans and will even allow me to pick him up for his health inspections without much issue. He too will beg me for treats that he can offer to his girls. He allows the girls to eat first and then if there is anything left he will partake. When free ranging outside he will often follow me hoping that I can give him a morsel to take to his favorite lady. I often time feel like a vending machine waiting to fill his order. Out of all my boys, Enigma is my favorite.

Polish:

These next guys with the fabulous hair are Polishes. Polishes are my favorite breed, I have more of them than any other breed on my farm. The Polishes are known as the “comedians” of the chicken world. As a breed the they are very curious and high strung. Due to their fabulous crests, their vision is limited thus everything spooks them, simple objects like their own dinner, coop mates, or surroundings will startle them. Due to their limited vision however they need to remain in the safety of a covered pen to protect them and their ladies from predation. I only allow my polish flocks out when I am in the backyard with them either working in the gardens or just chilling with my peeps. This aside, the Polish gents make great roosters for a keeper who does not mind their antics. They are very easy to pick up and hold and due to their limited vision. They are a bit high strung only because they cannot see well which is part of what makes the Polish such and entertaining breed to own. They easily get themselves into trouble and then cannot see well enough to get themselves out of it. Keeping this breed requires some planning on the keepers part. Because they are very curious they need a variety of entertainment sources while they are confined to their pens. Simple things like mealworms to scratch around for in the shaving or a bottle filled with scratch with small holes that they have to extract the scratch from. I  place parrot toys in their pens to give them something to play with. They will happily peck and play with the hanging toys all the while being spooked by it at the same time. They really are an endless form of entertainment in the backyard. The ladies will often perch on their keepers legs or arms making great lap chickens.

Silkie:

 

The second most numerous flock I have on my farm are the Silkies. Silkies are known as the “Teddy Bears” of the chicken world. Due to their feathers that are “fur-like” they are the cuddle bunnies of the flock. Silkies as a breed are known world over for being very docile, friendly, and calm. They are voted time and time again as the best breed to have for kids who want a coop of chickens to care for. I currently have a flock of 14 Silkies, 6 are roosters. Two roosters are in the coop with the ladies, the rest are in a bachelor pen I have set up for my access Silkie studs. My Silkie gents are very will behaved. They are not aggressive and will actually run from me when I try to pick them up. They are very shy and timid. The ladies are very friendly and enjoy interactions with their care takers. I have no trouble with my Silkie roosters at all. Like the Polish, its best to keep Silkies in the protection of a covered coop and pen unless you are outside with them. Due to their overwhelmingly shy and timid nature they would rather run from a predator than protect the ladies like most roosters do. When I can get ahold of the guys they are very docile and calm in my hands as I hold them. They would rather hide under a rock but are very easy going if I need to handle them.

Easter Eggers:

The final two guys I am going to introduce you too are Dracula and Frankenstein. These two guys are Easter Eggers and although not known as an exceptionally docile breed, these two boys are well behaved. I typically buy my chicks from hatcheries, however, last year I bought 6 chicks from my local feed store. 4 of the chicks I purchased were girls the other two are boys; Dracula and Frankenstein. The girls are in the Kuntry Klucker pen with Enigma, so these two studs are in a bachelor pen. They cohabitate very well and are very happy living up the single life in their bachelor digs.

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While there are many more breeds available, the breeds listed I have first hand experience with and can vouch for their temperament and disposition. Most roosters with the exception of the Polish and Silkie in my experience have a job to do and take it seriously. That aside, roosters are readily able to tell that their keeper is an ally and not an enemy. Providing food and treats for the girls only further establishes the keepers role as a friend and helper and not an enemy.

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Like any other subject there are always outliers, members that deviate from the norm. Roosters are no different, they are very much individuals, however as a whole the temperament of the breed does play a major part in the behavior of the gents. I have 20 or so roosters, the majority residing in bachelor pens. I do not have a problem with any one of my boys. Even the guys that are in the bachelor digs are very well behaved and display a temperament true of their breed. The two Easter Egger roosters that I have Dracula and Frankenstein are even very well mannered even though as a whole their breed does not agree. Thus, it is even possible to have a breed that is not renowned for being docile and calm and still end up with very friendly roosters.

I hope that this post has been helpful for those thinking about acquiring roosters for or with their spring chickens. It is very possible to have your cake and eat it too when it comes to keeping roosters. Selecting gents from breeds that are well known for being calm and docile is an excellent place to start. If you have any questions please feel to leave a comment, I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Thanks for reading, till next time keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Multiple Roosters in Your Backyard Flock.

Contrary to what is commonly thought, keeping multiple roosters in one flock is a worthwhile decision especially if your birds free range. It is a misconception to assume that only one rooster is best to oversee your flock. However, in order for multiple roosters to live in peace with each other, several requirements need to be meet. In this post, I am going to show you how my 6 roosters cohabitant while presiding over their girls. But first, allow me to introduce you to all the boys.

Dracula and Frankenstien: Dracula and Frankenstien are Easter Eggars they roost in The Kuntry Klucker, they grew up together and are buddies.

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Van Gogh: Van Gogh is a Polish part of the same clutch as Dracula and Frankenstein. Because they grew up together and roost in The Kuntry Klucker these three are civil with each other and get along well.

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Enigma: Enigma is a Motted Cochin, he is the oldest of The Kuntry Klucker boys. At 3 years old, he is the senior rooster in The Kuntry Klucker. He is civil with the other three roosters in the coop but prefers to put distance between himself and the others during the day while free ranging. He looks after the oldest girls, Buff Orphingtons who are pushing 9 years old this summer. He also adopted two White Crested Polish ladies that live in another coop further down the “coop-hood” as part of his section of girls to look after.

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Devros and Micky Smith: Devros and Micky Smith share responsibility in taking care of the Silkies that live in the TARDIS. They collectively look after these girls and will run the larger boys off that cross over their boundary line.

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To successfully keep multiple roosters in your flock these three requirements need to be meet.

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1.Ample Space

The first thing to consider in keeping multiple roosters is space. Roosters, if several are present in a flock will divide up the free ranging space into territories. Each rooster will look after a portion of the girls in “his” specified territory. Each rooster will know the boundaries of his dominion. If a rooster should step outside his bounds a confrontation would then ensue. To ensure that your roosters will live peacefully with one another they must have enough space to roam.

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For example, I have 6 roosters roaming my backyard every day. Three of my boys who grew up together (Dracula, Frankenstein and Van Gogh) inhabit the same territory. These three boys have their own hens but are more than comfortable to be near each other during the day, sharing the same territory.

My other 3 roosters are a bit more territorial. Enigma, who roosts in the same coop as Dracula, Frankenstein, and Van Gogh does not really appreciate these three individuals near his ladies. When they are in the backyard he will run them off from the section of the yard that he has claimed as his jurisdiction.

Devros and Micky Smith (my Silkie Roosters) grew up together like Frankenstein, Dracula, and Van Gogh they are civil in sharing the same territory with each other. However, if any other of the boys breech their territorial boundaries they will collectively run off the intruders.

2. Several feeding and watering stations

When free ranging it is the job of the roosters to look for food for the girls. He will hunt for bugs, seeds, or weeds for them to dine on. He will also lead them to food and water if he feels that it’s time for them to eat. Each rooster leading a section of the hens, multiple feeding and watering stations makes it possible for them to take care of the girls while avoiding confrontations over the food and water supply. Each of my coops have their own food and water plus an additional one in the yard to ensure that all my chickens and especially the roosters have ample access to nourishment for both themselves and their ladies.

3. Sufficient number of hens

The roosters and hens will decide amongst themselves who belongs on which rooster team, there needs to be enough hens to go around. It is typical for one rooster to manage and service anywhere from 6-10 hens individually. If there are not enough hens to divide amongst the boys serious problems can arise.

If there are too many rooster for too few hens the hens can become injured through over mating. The hens will be mated too often which can cause feather loss, wounds on her back, and other injuries by aggressive mating by too many roosters. If there are too few hens, fighting amongst the roosters will be more frequent as they compete for the hens.

To combat this problem there are a few solutions that can be implemented. If you want to keep all your boys, you can establish a Bachelor Pen for access roosters. I have two, one for my standard size boys and one for my bantam size boys. All members live peacefully in their bachelor digs.

Another option would be to re-home or cull your access boys. The long and short of it is either an increase in hen number is needed or a decrease in rooster numbers in needed.

I have about 50 hens total and 6 roosters in the yard to look after them and care for them when I am not around. I do have more than 6 roosters, my rooster total is actually 15. I chose the best roosters to be in the yard with the girls, the rest I have placed in bachelor pens. Not all roosters will be best for your ladies, some can be bit rough or too aggressive during mating or with other roosters. The roosters that have the best temperaments with the other boys and gentle with the girls made the cut.

If an unfortunate event transpires where I lose one or more of my boys either to illness or a predator attack, I will then pull from the bachelor pool to fill the job opening. I also keep my boys for breeding. I tend to gravitate towards the more rare breeds so being able to procreate my flock is of value to me. Thus, unlike a lot of backyard chickens keepers I hang on to all my boys. I have found throughout my years of keeping chickens that a rooster is a creature of value and worth. I may not need the service of all 15 at one time but there may come a time where I will need them.

I hope that you have found this post helpful in managing roosters in your flock. If you live in the city, roosters are most likely not permitted. However, those that live in the county or country have more options when it comes to roosters.

I am of the persuasion that roosters are an amazing creature. I value them for the part they play in the social structure of a flock. In the past, I have sustained a span of several years where I did not have a rooster. During this time I learned the true value of a rooster and the completion and balance that his presence truly brings to my flock.

Roosters are not the blood thirsty vicious creature of the past. When hand raised and raised with care they make a very admirable addition to the backyard or barnyard setting.

Before I go, I want to leave with you a video of my roosters greeting the new day.

As always, thanks for reading!!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Bachelor Pens for Roosters

When faced with a surplus of roosters many people panic because they don’t know what to do. They know of several options from days of old such things as freezer camp (butchering surplus roosters), giving them away, or just hoping for the best with so many boys around. Might I suggest another approach. A bachelor pen. I currently have two bachelor pens for my boys. One for the Standard size and another for the Bantam size boys. I could probably keep them together in one large pen, but I feel better separating them into two pens.

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A rooster is a selfless creature, often sacrificing himself to save the lives of your girls. A fearless warrior with a heart of gold. Majestic and beautiful, a natural born singer who writes his own songs. A dancer, who loves to waltz for those he cares about. A true gentlemen. And sadly the most abused, unwanted, and forgotten of all the creatures.

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I love roosters, I value their role in a backyard flock as protectors and caretakers of my hens. I have found myself in the past not having enough roosters and needing them desperately.

When I first started out with chicken keeping I was terrified of roosters. I did not want one at any cost. I prayed and hoped that my batch of chicks were all girls like I had ordered. Well as fate would have it, I had three roosters, I panicked! What was I going to do with all these roosters? I could maybe stomach keeping just one, but the rest had to go. After some time and hard work, I found homes for the other two and just kept one. His name was Roy, through him I learned how wonderful roosters really are. Roy taught me so much. I owe him a debt of graditude, he was a gentleman with feathers. I was shocked at how tame he was, I realized how wrong I had been for being so afraid of him.

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To my detriment Roy passed after several years due to illness. I was without a rooster for 5 years. Till finally throughout the years my girls passed away and I needed more chickens. This time I was excited as my chicks got older some began to crow. I finally had roosters!! Now I have about 15 roosters, a little more than what I was hoping for but a surplus at least.

So now the question comes up, what am I going to do with all these glorious boys? Well, instead of freaking out and trying to unload as many as I can, I am going to keep them ALL. I cannot keep all of them with my girls, that would be an unhealthy situation for my hens. Instead I am going to prepare for them their own digs, a bachelor pen.

Roosters, when raised up in the same flock are more corgial than most people might think. If raised together from chickhood they can and do cohabitant together very well. Roosters fight when they have something that they need to defend. Without access to hens, there is nothing to defend. This is how a bachelor pen works.

So, all of my surplus roosters will find their forever home here on my farm in their own special digs. Separate from the hens, they will live in a bachelor pen. They will have a large outdoor pen for which to roam and hunt for bugs when the weather is good. But they will have no access to the hens, squandering any need to fight or claim territory over one another. I will choose a few that will run with the girls and protect my flock while they are free ranging. As for the rest, instead of freezer camp they will live peacefully in the bachelor pen that I have prepared for them.

I find a lot of value in roosters and will not re-home any of them. If for some reason one of the roosters heading up a flock becomes ill or even worse passes away, I will have others to take his place. A situation I did not have years ago when I needed it so desperately.

So for those that are panicking because you have more roosters than you counted on, don’t freak out. Prepare a bachelor pen for them to live in. You don’t need to go to all the work of trying to franticly find a home or someone else that will take him off your hands. Keep your boys, just put them in a separate coop and pen and enjoy the songs they sing for you.

Roosters really are wonderful creatures and deserve much better than what they are often dealt. You don’t have to get rid of your boys, the time may come when you will need one. Whether for protection from predators or the need to procreate your flock.

I hope that this post was helpful in sorting out a common rooster issues.

To see a video of my bachelor pens visit my youtube channel by clicking on the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vxwn5Y7fo7E

It is also possible to keep more than one rooster in your flock. To see how I manage more than one rooster in my flock with the hens please click here.

As always, thanks for reading. If you have any questions feel free to post in the comments and I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Till next time, keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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A Boy and his Rooster.

Some kids have dogs, cats, goldfish or guinea pigs as pets. My son however has a pet rooster. It did not start out this way but it has ended up this way. This is the story of a boy and his rooster.

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You see Roy, our resident backyard rooster has had a few set backs with his health in the past few years. This often requires me to separate him from the girls in order to tend to his needs and treat him individually. He came to our farm the way the other girls did when I ordered our chicks and that arrived in the mail as a small peeping box.

He however was different, he has always been rather fearless and bull headed. He hates my husband due to the fact that it is often he who pushes the lawn mower, which he hates. For the longest time I was the only one who could go out the the backyard and pick him up with out being threatened with a confrontation. Now the roles have totally reversed.

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This all started a few summers ago when Roy was attacked by a hawk. I never saw the hawk or the confrontation, I only saw the after effects. Roy apparently won the fight because he was alive when I found him although injured. The hawk attacked his head causing some pretty nasty wounds which I treated. He made a full physical recovery but not a neurological one. You see when the hawk attacked him it went after his head, his skull was not broken but I wonder if Roy hit his head or twisted his neck when the Hawk tried to lift him than dropped him (judging by his injuries and the crime scene).

Later that summer I went out to the backyard to check on the girls and found him passed out on the ground. After later assessment it was determined that he possibly had a stroke or some other health malfunction which caused him collapse. Ever since these two events he has had health issues and often has episodes where he cannot walk well and needs some special care.

I separate him from the girls because chickens have natural cannibalism habits which from an evolutionary perspective is beneficial in flock survival. You see a weak member exposes the whole flock to predators, so to counter the effect of this issue the flock will literally kill and eat the sick or injured member. This is all well and good except for one problem, the girls are domesticated and protected from most predators and are pets not food. Our rooster is no different. He is a our pet and a member of our backyard family, we just don’t eat family members no matter how sick.

So his life as a bachelor began. After some time of him living in a large dog kennel I finally purchased a small chicken coop for him to live in. It has been affectionally named “Roy’s Roost”. He has taken very well to his new digs and has improved quite a bit with all the loving care he has been receiving.

Now enter my son. Upon ordering this coop I had no intentions of selling out chicken care to my kids. However, once we got this coop put together my son took to it like a fly to sugar. He loved it!! It is small, easy to clean and maintain, and just his size. The resident rooster needing a bit of loving care has accepting my son as his nurse nightingale. The two have bonded and formed a close relationship. I take care of the Kuntry Klucker girls while my son takes care of Roy’s Roost.

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Roy looks forward to his boy coming out and taking care of him every day. He is wide awake, looking out the coop windows eagerly waiting for him. He clucks and coos to him and my son lovingly talks back. I never thought that my son would form a strong bond with our flock rooster, but behold it has happened. It is the sweetest thing to see the two of them out in the yard together.

Roy is doing much better, he has his good days and his bad days. Some days his legs give him trouble and some days he is out in the backyard with my kids playing. I don’t know how much time he has left with us, but I do know that till the very end he will be loved, spoiled, and adored by the boy who Roy has adopted as his caretaker.

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Some kids have dogs, cats, or goldfish as pets. My son has a rooster. This was the story of a boy and his rooster.

Thanks for reading, the girls and I will be back with more adventures and stores soon.

~The Kuntry Klucker Crew~

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Roy the Rooster

I thought I would dedicate a post to my resident rooster, Roy. When I tell people that I have chickens I am usually asked two questions. one, how many chickens do I have, and two, do I have a rooster? For many people all they know about roosters are the horror stories passed down by previous generation of a fearsome barnyard bird.

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I will say, that when I am not in the backyard Roy rules the yard but in a good way. You see he keeps watch over the girls as they graze and go about their day of hunting and pecking. He keeps a sharp eye for predators that could harm the girls, if he senses a danger he will then sound the alarm sending the girls running for cover. He will then take his position as the sacrifice for the girls in the yard.

Luckily, the only danger that Roy and I have to worry about is something arial in nature. My backyard is fenced in by a 6 foot wood privacy fence, so most four legged threats are denied access to their ranging grounds. Only an arial attack would be a threat to my flock. However, I do have a story about this that is very interesting that I will share with you later.

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So now, back to Roy. Where did and I get him and how does your basic backyard rooster behave? I ordered my flock as chicks from a reputable breeder. I ordered 16 hens and 1 rooster. They arrived in a box as little yellow balls of peeping fluff. The only way I could tell Roy from the rest of the girls was a blue mark on his head (sharpie marker) administered by the breeder so I could identify our barnyard boy. Below is Roy’s baby picture, he was about a week old here, and already he had a look of command.

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From the beginning Roy was a little bit different than the others. I could not say that if he did not have his mark that I could single him out as the rooster till he matured more. But I will say, that even in the brooder he was the boss. He was not mean to the girls or anything, he just had a demeaner about him that demanded respect.

Well as the chicks grew he began to show his rooster features, a large comb, waddle, and finally a crow. The first time I heard him crow was so funny. I remember it well. I was filling the feeders in the morning, talking to the girls when all at once I heard this noise come from Roy. It was not a cock-a-doodle-doo like you normally picture a rooster belting. But more of a cock-a-chock-caugh-squeek. It was the funniest thing I ever heard. I remember looking up and saying Roy, “what was that”? Well after a few days he got his crow worked out and now he sounds like your typical rooster.

Roy is the first rooster that I ever personally had. I have seen roosters and been around them growing up, but never actually owned one till now. Honestly, I was nervous, I knew that they could be aggressive and even down right nasty. But I also knew that other people had them and treated them like cuddle bugs. I had no idea how one could even pick up a rooster let alone be friends with it. Well on the heals of that I did some research and found the secret to raising roosters. It is not about making friends with it, but actually training him to see you as the alpha rooster, positioning yourself at the top of the pecking order.

You see chickens are highly social animals and understand social order and their particular place with the pecking order. All the girls know each other, and they all know who is above who and who is below who. Roy ultimately being the alpha or at the top of the pecking order. Well, that is till I come into the backyard, than I am alpha rooster.

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You see from a very early age I had to train Roy that I was the alpha rooster, I basically had to treat Roy like an alpha rooster would treat a beta (second in command) rooster. I did not hurt him or anything, it was simple, subtle things that roosters understand. Such as, if he tried to come too close to me when I was out feeding the girls I would take a few large stomping steps towards him letting him know that he was getting too close to the alpha rooster. This told him that I was in command and that he needed to keep a respectful distance. I would pick him up and carry him around for a little bit as I talked to the girls. This showed him that I could physically dominate him without causing him any harm.  I would then release him after a while and allow him to reassemble with the girls. As we grew, I would then feed him treats and so forth which he we then distribute to the girls. This way he not only saw me as the alpha rooster, but also as the provider for their needs.

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try to challenge me once, but that is about it. I will have to say with a lot research, work, and understanding of chicken behavior, I have the best behaved rooster I could evI have never had a problem with him attacking me. He dider wish for. Honestly, I will have to say he is my helper in the backyard. He takes care of the girls for me when I cannot be in the backyard with them.

Ok, now I will share with you a story of Roy in action. A several years ago, I was inside doing housework and heard Roy crowing relentlessly. It is normal for him to crow on and off during the day but to just crow and crow and crow was rather unusual. If he crows like that something is not right or possibly even dangerously wrong. So, in a hurry I put my boots on and ran to the backyard to see what had Roy so upset. The first thing I noticed upon going outside was several large birds circling over my backyard. My heart sank because I expected to see one or more of the girls torn to pieces in the backyard. But to my shocking surprise, Roy was planning to take the hawks on single handily.

You see, he had given the warning and the girls ran and were huddled under the large shade tree next to their coop. Roy was in the middle of the backyard acting like a distraction to detour the hawks attention to him and not the girls. The crowing that I heard inside was him crowing at the hawks reading himself for the attack. When I got to the backyard and realizes the reality of the situation I grabbed the closest thing I could find and waved it in the air. I must have looked really dumb to anyone passing by, but I was backup for my rooster. I grabbed a hoe that was leaning against the coop and waved it in the air scaring the hawks off. They left screeching I assume disappointed that their dinner was protected. Roy, after the hawks flew off looked at me with a sigh of relief. That day I gained to much respect for him, his nature, and his ability to protect my girls. I knew then and there that he was indeed the best rooster I could ever hope for.

Had I not heard his battle cry, I hate to think what would happen to him. I know that he had no chance against 3 hungry hawks, I am sure he knew that too. But regardless he took his position and readied for a battle the he would loose at the cost of protecting the girls. I have never seen such love and devotion in an animal before. He really is my prize jewel of the backyard. Now whenever I hear his battle cry I do not hesitate and come to his aid. So far we have evaded, several hawks and a few turkey buzzards. I will have to say that we make a pretty good team.

For this reason, whenever I am away from the house, I make sure they are secure in the pen. When I get home, if the weather is good I will let them out into the yard. But I always keep an ear open for Roy’s crow. He will let me know and call me if something is wrong or if he needs backup.

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So here is to what having a rooster is really like. If you raise them well, take the time to understand them and their nature, and assert yourself as both their provider and supervisor they will respect you and be your biggest allie in the flock. Roosters are not the horror stories of yesteryear. Yes they are roosters and they do have a job to do which they take rather seriously. However, when raised will with love and care they are one of the most amazing creatures and worthy of all the respect they deserve.

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So here is to my Roy Boy, you are indeed the man.

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Thank for reading and following along our adventures. Tell next time, keep on crowing.

The Kuntry Klucker Crew

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