Bachelor Pens for Roosters

When faced with surplus roosters, many people panic, unsure what to do. They know of several options from days of old freezer camp (butchering surplus roosters), rehoming, or just hoping for the best. Might I suggest another approach. A bachelor pen.

The Coop De Ville is the bachelor pen on The Kuntry Klucker Farm. I have a passion for roosters and keep all roosters that I aquire. It is a mistake to assuem that roosters cannot live together peacefully. Roosters are more than capable to cohabitate, but there are few guidlines to adhere to in order to achieve success.

In this post, I will detail how to successfully implement the use of a bachelor pen for excess roosters.

The Coop De Ville, bachelor pen. Pollux (White Crested Polish Rooster) greeting the day.

A rooster is a selfless creature, often sacrificing himself to save the lives of his girls. A fearless warrior with a heart of gold. Majestic and beautiful, a natural born singer who writes his own songs. A dancer, who loves to waltz for those he cares about. A true gentlemen. And sadly the most abused, unwanted, and forgotten of all the creatures.

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Roy (Buff Orpington Rooster). My first gent and rooster teacher.

I love roosters, I value their role in a backyard flock as protectors and caretakers of my hens. I have found myself in the past without roosters, needing them desperately.

When I first started keeping chickens, I was terrified of roosters. I did not want one at any cost. I prayed and hoped that my batch of chicks were all females. As fate would have it, I had three roosters, I panicked! What was I going to do with all these roosters? I could maybe stomach keeping just one, but the rest had to go. After some time and hard work, I found homes for the other two, keeping just one, Roy.

Roy showed me another side of rooster I did not expect, my rooster teacher. I owe him a debt of graditude. He was a gentleman with feathers, through him, I realized how wrong I was to fear roosters.

We often associate roosters as being aggressive, blood thirsty, nasty birds. We encountered these nightmare birds on our grandparents farm. In our grandparents day, chickens were kept a food, be it eggs or meat, an aggressive rooster was needed. These killer birds are categorized as game cocks by today’s breeding standards.

As the backyard chicken movement has exploded, breeders have responded, selecting for traits much for suited for the backyard or hobby farm setting. Behavioral traits such as calm, friendly, laid back and approachable. Gone are the days of the fearsom bird that roamed our grandparents farm, meet the roosters of today.

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To my detriment, Roy passed on several year later due to illness. I was without a rooster for 5 years. Throughout the years, my girls over time to passed away. Till finally, I acquired more chicks. This time I was excited, as my chicks matured, some began to crow. I finally had roosters!! Now I have 13 roosters, a little more than what I was hoping for, but a surplus at last. I decided to keep all the boys, my solution, a Bachelor Pen.

Step to achieve a successful Bachelor Pen.

No access hens:

Roosters, when raised together are more corgial than you might expect. If raised together from chickhood, they can and do cohabitant together very well. A bachelor pen works if and only if, the residents have no access to the hens. This is pivotal to the success of housing roosters together. Roosters fight when presented with the need to achieve status, specifically in the presence of hens. Without access to hens, there is nothing to compete over. They can see the hens and the rest of the flock, but no contact can be permitted. This is the fundamental aspect of a bachelor pen. If the bachelor boys gain access to the hens, fighting and competition will ensue. Once bachelor residents engage in conflict, it is hard to reestablish peace.

Ample Space:

The Coop De Ville residnets preparing for the evening roost.

Besides no access to hen, the second key to a successsful bachelor pen is ample room. The Coop De Ville has a covered pen and a large outdoor recretation access area. Allowing the boys to spread out, providing room for healthy natural activity such as dust bathing. The bachelor boys have access to fresh air, sunshine, worms and bugs, much like the free ranging flock. While in the outdoor run area, the bachelor residents can interact and engage with the flock, but denied all contact.

Care for a Bachelor Pen:

Pollux (White Crested Polish Rooster) looking out the Coop De Ville’s (bachelor pen) window.

The care for a bachelor pen is the same as a coop with hens. The bachelor pen gets cleaned daily, supplied with fresh water, and feed. The only differece is that a bachelor coop/pen does not need laying boxes or nesting material. All other maintenance is the same. I service my bachelor pen residents as I do the primary flock. All bachelor boys get health checks and other regiments to maintain good health.

If you find yourself panicking because you have more roosters than you counted on, don’t freak out. It is not always possible to rehome extra roosters. In the early summer, the internet is flooded with unexpected spring roosters needing homes. Prepare a bachelor pen for them to live in. You don’t need to go to all the work of trying to franticly find a home or someone else to take him off your hands. Keep your boys, just put them in a separate coop/pen and enjoy the songs they sing for you.

Roosters are wonderful creatures, deserving much more than they are often dealt. You don’t have to get rid of your boys, the time may come when you will need a rooster. Whether for protection, predators or the need to populate your flock.

I hope that this post was helpful in offering another suggestion for excess roosters.

To see a video of my bachelor pens visit my youtube channel by clicking on the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vxwn5Y7fo7E

It is also possible to keep more than one rooster in your flock. To see how I manage more than one rooster in my flock with the hens please click here.

If you have any questions, feel free to post in the comment section. You can also drop me a line at kuntryklucker@gmail.com

If you have time, drop by and visit the Kuntry Klucker Crew on facebook.

In addition, to The Kuntry Klucker, I maintain a sister blog, “Knowledge of the Spheres”. If the subject matter of astronomy, astrophysics, or anything space interests you, please drop by.

As always, thanks for reading. Till next time, keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

Caster and Pollux (White Crested Polish Roosters) in the outdoor recreation area.

7 Reasons to Love White Crested Polishes.

With their crazy 80’s rock band hair do, it’s hard not to love this fancy breed. Dressed in black and white, they look like they’re going to a fancy “Chicken Gala”. These classy girls leave all other chickens in the dust when it comes to clucky high class couture. The distinct white feathered crest on their head contrasting with their sleek jet black bodies sets them apart in a flock. Beauty may only be skin deep, but these girls are gorgeous inside and out. Read on to find out why we at The Kuntry Klucker Farm are head over hills in love with these black and white beauties.

 

      1. Every polish chicken is crowned with white crest.

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White Crested Polish chickens and all Polish breeds always stand out due to the large fluffy bouffant of feathers that adorn their head like some kind of glamorous crown, the most iconic feature of this fancy breed. It’s this feature that makes them a very popular choice for those who want something a little “different” in the flock. They will make visitors ask, “what is that?” due to the fact that they do not look like a standard chicken. As aesthetic as their crest may appear, be warned that these guys and gals need a little bit of “hair care”. Do to their crown of feathers their vision is limited and may need to be trimmed or put in pigtails to allow them to see better. Because they are unable to groom their crests they are susceptible to mites and lice. To prevent this problem an owner needs to take proactive steps to keep these guys and gals looking their best. Because they do not tolerate being wet or dirty, an owner needs to provide a leak free dry coop and run. If a keeper can provide these services, this breed will bring great joy and diversity to the flock.

2. Non-broody hens who have more time to lay eggs and pose for pictures. 

Broodiness is not a trait that is possessed by the Polish chicken, broodiness is the desire to incubate eggs and hatch chicks. Some breeds are prone to broodiness such as the Silkie and Orphington, the polish is one of the few breeds that are not. Because of this, they will continue to lay eggs for their keeper. Be warned though they are not prolific layers like other breeds, they lay about 120 small white eggs a year.

But don’t let this turn you off from the White Crested Polish chicken, they make up for the low egg output in other ways. For example, they make excellent and unique subjects for all kinds of photo ops. They are very docile and even tempered so working with them is a breeze.  Which brings me to my next point.

 

3. Loyal and loving backyard companions. 

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If you are looking for a loyal backyard friend, look no further than the White Crested Polish. Due to diminished vision, a consequence of their glorious crests, they will happily sit in the protection of their owners lap. Polishes become very attached to their owners often following them around the yard much like a dog. They crave human interaction and are happiest in the company of their owners. They are nervous and flighty by nature needing a dedicated and compassionate keeper who doesn’t mind giving them a little extra attention. If kept in a flock due to vision limitatios, they tend to be at the bottom of the “pecking order”. For this reason, it’s best if they have digs of their own separate from larger or more aggressive breeds.

4. Delightful and unique personalities. 

The personality of the White Crested Polish is just as unique as their appearance. These guys and gals love to jabber and talk to their owner. If you want a chicken that you can have a conversation with, the White Crested Polish is the breed for you. They get very excited when their owner comes to the backyard, run, or coop. They want to follow you around and tell you all about their day. They eagerly bock, squeak, or trill all the details of their adventures. For this reason they are one of the noisier breeds, they are not quiet much like the Silkies. If this is okay for your situation then I highly recommend these little gossip gals.

 

5. Stunning phasic! 

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These guys and gals have a beautifully proportioned silhouette. Aside from the crest feathers that get in the way and diminish their vision, Polishes really have a shapely and attractive figure. They have full breasts, shapely wings, and deep bodies. As they strut towards you they have a playful bounce to their gate which further accents their crown of feathers. These guys and gals will truly be eye candy in your backyard flock.

5. Make excellent birds for poultry shows.

Polish chickens always stand out due to the large fluffy bouffant of feathers that adorn their head like a glamorous crown. It’s no surprise that the stylish look of these distinctive chooks make them a popular choice in poultry shows all round the world. When it comes to male crests in the competitive world of show chickens the bigger the better whereas a more round and even shaped crest is favored among hens. The roosters are very distigueshed, but due to their larger crests the feathers seem to take on more of a 80’s rock hair band look. When trimmed and kept nice a well groomed polish rooster can steal the show.

 

6. Great breed to have around children. 

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If you want to involve kids with keeping backyard chickens, the Polish is a great breed to choose. Due to their appearance kids are often times captivated with the White Crested Polish. They are a gentile breed that is docile and not prone to aggression. Even the roosters are fairly good natured as compared to other breeds. Due to their vision limitations from their crests, they are fairly easy for kids to catch and bond with. They are a bit flighty which might startle young kids at first but once they get used to their behaviors they will really enjoy their feathered friends in the backyard. Currently I have 9 Polishes of different colors all of them are great with my boys.

7. Mysterious History. Where did they come from? 

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It is not really clear where these stunning birds came from. You may be thinking that they came from Poland. But this is not the case. Their name is derived from the Dutch word “pol” which means head, however that is still being debated amongst poultry experts. It has also been hypothesized that they originated in the Netherlands, whereas other enthusiasts think that they were brought to Europe during the time of the Medieval Mongols. Other fun loving chicken lovers such as myself ponder if their origins are not of this world at all. Possibly like H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu, they came from Orion or another world out there, just kidding 🙂 . In all seriousness though, no one really knows where these crown jewels really came from. Still today there remains a lot of mystery surrounding their origins. Maybe we will never know, but for rare breed chicken lovers that does not really matter. If anything, it just makes these cuddly backyard buddies even more lovable.

Are these classy chickens right for your backyard flock?

If you choose to keep these unique chickens several requirements must be meet.

~ A secure coop and outdoor pen are a must. Since they are unable to see well they can be vulnerable to arial predator attacks. If you are unable to supervise them keep your birds secure in their pen till you can spend time with them.

~ Due to their crest feathers they require extra vigilance that they do not get wet. During the winter if their crest feathers get wet it can freeze causing discomfort and in some cases illness to the bird.

~ If you decide to keep these girls, a separate coop for them is a must. Due to their diminished vision they often times reside at the bottom of the pecking order and can at times be picked on.

~ Making sure the they have a clean and dry place to themselves will assure their success as a part of your backyard flock. While your at it, have a little fun with their home. A classy chicken with a personality such as the Polish need a coop with some character. Many places like Tractor Supply and Hayneedle have adorable coops the would compliment your fancy couture wearing girls nicely.

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As always thanks for reading!

If you have any questions regarding the Polish breed feel free by leaving a comment. I will get back to you as soon as I can.

10 Joys of Keeping Backyard Chickens.

I’m almost about 10 years deep into my backyard chicken hobby and have loved it every step of the way. From ordering chicks, getting the coops set up, watching them grow, and collecting eggs, keeping backyard chickens has been one of the highlights of my life. Chickens are animals that require little but give back much in return. In this post I will highlight the 10 joys I have experienced as a backyard chicken keeper.

1. They are always happy to see me

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No matter how bad my day has been at work or other wise my girls are always happy to see me. In the mornings when I enter the backyard opening the coops for the day they are thrilled at my presence. They cluck with joy as I prepare their food, water, and clean their coops. They are genuially happy to see me. After a long day at work or just a bad day in general,  I can always go to the backyard and find happiness on their faces. They flock, running sometimes flying in from the far ends of the yard thrilled to see me. Their joy in response to my presences lifts my spirits and in return brings joy to my day.

2. Companions in the backyard.

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Dogs come to mind for most people when thinking about backyard companions. But chickens, can be just as much of a companion as can a family dog. For example, Tilling Day is a flock affair! Tilling up the garden for the upcoming garden season is a big deal . They follow in the path of the tiller gobbling up all the worms that were unearthed, all the while further assisting me in turning the soil over. It’s not just gardening that attract the flocks attention, the girls are alway eager to be involved in what ever I am doing. Anything from painting coops to mowing the yard attracts all kinds of “hen-help”. Chickens are very curious creatures, they want in on everything that I am doing. Sometimes they get rewarded with a big juicy worm while gardening and other times its dust bathing in the potting soil bag or eating fresh grass clippings Either way, no matter what I am doing, I often have a flock of curious girls wanting in on whatever is going on.

3. Collecting Farm Fresh Eggs daily.

There is nothing quite like collecting farm fresh eggs from the backyard. After eating organic pasture raised farm fresh eggs its hard to go back to store bought. The feeling of finding an egg or more in the nesting box never gets old. Chickens really are the pet that makes you breakfast. There is pure and simple joy that connects one to the days of old while collecting eggs from the coops.

4. Observing the complex social structure of the flock.

Chickens are very highly socially organized creatures contrary to what many people think. A flock of chickens are organized into a hierarchy, each member knowing his or her place. The term “pecking order” is derived from this complex social system of chickens and for good reason. At the top of the pecking order is typically the alpha rooster, under him will be the other roosters in the flock. The roosters determine who is the alpha by competing for the position. Following the roosters will be the alpha hen, this is the hen that has earned her right to be at the top of the order directly under the rooster. The alpha hen is usually a little bit bossy in regards to the other hens in the flock. As for the rest of the members, position is established by literally “pecking” another hen on the back indicating that the pecker is above the peckie. This behavior flows from the alpha hen all the way to the bottom of the order. Each chicken pecking someone else on the back indicating their position in the order.

Once the pecking order is established all activities of the flock revolve around the order. Simple things such as the order in which the flock exits the coop in the morning and the order in which they return. Watching this animal behavior in my own flock is very interesting. More importantly the pecking order is always changing. If a member of the flock is sick and needs to be separated for treatment, in the absence of the member the flock order will adjust. The same is true for when a member dies. In the case of a death of a member the order will usually take on an extreme adjustment. For example, when our rooster Roy died the flock was suddenly without its top member, a rooster. The remaining hens in the flock had to decide who would take his place at the top of the pecking order, claiming the position of the alpha hen. For several days the flock worked through this decision and finally come an agreement on who would be the head honcho. As a backyard keeper, this behavior is very interesting to observe. Furthermore, it brings home the literal interpretation and understanding of the term “pecking order”.

5. Watching a mother hen raise her young.

Let’s be honest, baby chicks are adorable. Whether they be wild birds or domestic, chicks are just about as adorable as a baby animal can get. What’s even better is having the opportunity to watch them grow. This is one of the simple joys of owning backyard chickens. I have several times throughout the years allowed a broody hen to incubate a small clutch of eggs. Each and every time it is an adventure and a pleasure to watch the process from egg to chick. This spring I allowed a broody Silkie to sit on a clutch of 7 eggs.

After anticipatingly waiting the predetermined 21-23 days for the eggs to incubate, they one by one started to hatch. Over the course of 3 days every single egg hatched into a beautiful healthy chick. The joy of watching this cycle of life is indeed an honor. Over the next several months the mother hen will teach her little ones how to be chickens. Such things as what to eat and not eat, how to dust bathe, where to find water, and where to roost at night.

If you are lucky enough be in the position to observe this cycle of life in person , it is indeed an educational and humbling experience. There is so much that we can learn from a mother hen and chickens in general. Chickens are amazing teachers, all that is needed is a willing soul to watch and listen. Below is a video of Miss Donna and her brood of 7.

 

6. The joy of watching a Rooster care for his flock.

Roosters are often unfairly stigmatized as being fearsome, blood thirsty, mean and nasty aggressive birds. While they do have a job to do and take it very seriously, they really are amazing and gentinle creatures. Personally, I love roosters I currently have 7 and value every one of them. Roosters, although not necessary in order to keep backyard chickens are an added bonus.

You see, when raised right, roosters are an asset to a flock of chickens. They preform many husbandry duties taking care of all the hens in the flock. If a flock has more than one rooster (such as mine does), they will divide the flock into groups each rooster taking care of a section of the hens.

They are much more than just merely protectors for the hens, they serve the flock in ways beyond this. For example, a rooster will hunt for his girls. He will actively look for food, things such as a big bug, juicy worm, or vegetation for them to eat. Once he finds something of value he will call his girls over to eat it. He will only eat what is left, he is self sacrificing looking out for the welfare of his hens. It’s as if by evolutionary design he knows the girls need the extra nutrition for the procreation of the flock (laying eggs). As the girls eat what he has found he will keep watch, sounding the alarm if there is a threat and if needed sacrificing himself for the safety of the hens. I have witnessed this first hand with my Buff Orphington Rooster, Roy. One afternoon while out in the backyard he sounded the alarm, I heard his cry from the house, rushed out the the backyard in time to see a hawk fly away. All the girls were safe under a large tree, Roy on the other hand was injured. Lucky, he recovered from the hawk inflicted injuries and lived for several more years. I learned on this day the true value of a rooster. You can read his story here.

A rooster will serve the flock in other way as well. He will lead the girls to the coop when time to roost, help raise young, break up any squabbles among the hens, and of course mate with the hens to propagate the flock. All these things and more make roosters a very valuable asset to the flock. As a backyard chicken keeper, I have peace of mind knowing that when not around the guys are on duty. It gives me great joy to hear my roosters crow in the morning and watch them interact with the flock.

7. Beauty a flock of chickens bring to my property.

There is just something soothing about a flock of chickens happily hunting and pecking on a lush green lawn. Their feathers contrasting with the surrounding greenery like little yard ornaments. Chickens when free ranging are a very welcoming sight, watching them as they search for delicacies to dine on. I allow my flock to free range in the backyard only confining them to their pens during periods of inclement weather. I love go to the backyard and see my flock busy at work, ridding my yard and gardens of all available bugs and pets. My evenings are usually spent sitting and watching them as they go about their business, taking in the ascetic pleasure they bring to my property. They really are beautiful, the different breeds together in the yard adds a diverse contrast to the evening setting. So for me, one of the joys of owning backyard chickens is simply sitting and appreciating the beauty they add to my homestead.

8. Observing the diversity of their personalities. 

Many people think that chickens are void of any personality or individual characteristics. This is so far from the truth. Chickens are a very social creature and with that comes  distinct personalities. They all have preferences of nesting boxes for which to lay they eggs. Some are more outgoing while other more reserved choosing to reside on the sidelines. Some want to be held while other prefer to be appreciated from afar.

Chickens are very complex creatures with individual personalities to match. I have a few girls that love the camera and will pose at any chance they get. Two of my flock hams are above Aphrodite (White Crested Polish: left) and Miss Sweet Pea (Buff Orhpington: right). These two girls are the standouts among all the flock members. They love attention and will do just about anything to get it.

Chickens are much like dogs in the fact that they love to interact with their care takers. Some members may be more upfront with human interaction while others more distant, but all my girls at one level or another want to feel appreciated. It was not until I had chickens that I realized how much of individuals they really are. It’s these characteristics that make them easy to identify and name. People often ask me if all my girls have names, I say “yes”. All 50+ chickens that I have are all named and often are assigned names based on their personality traits. It’s not as hard as you would think to name 50 or so birds and not get them confused. They make it pretty easy to keep all their identities straight. Which bring me to my next point.

9. Constant comedy in the backyard.

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Chickens are without a doubt constant comedy! They are one of the funniest animals that I have had the pleasure to keep. Whether it be something funny that an individual does or something that whole flock does, chickens are the comedians of the barnyard. One of funniest interactions that a flock can engage in is something I call “the chicken keep away game”. When a hen finds something such as a juicy bug or big worm she will announce to the whole flock with glee that she has found a prize. With the object in her beak she will run around the yard while the others chase her wanting to get a piece of her find. Depending on how large the trophy bug or worm is, this could go on for quite some time. Changing beaks several times till finally someone eats the morsel or looses it. It’s just about as close as a flock of chickens can get to touch football.

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Another funny chicken oddity is the Polish chicken. Pictured above are two White Crested Polishes, Aphrodite and Apollo. Out of all the breeds that I have, this breed holds the crown for comedy. Due to their crests their vision is limited, not able to see what is above them. For this reason just about everything spooks them, simple things in their environment can get a rise out of them. They have a tendency to be flighty and high strung for this reason. Additionally, they are a very curious breed always getting them selves in trouble, then not being able to see well enough to get themselves out of it. They will often time call for other flock members to rescue them from their predicament. Typically one of the roosters will come to their rescue if I am not there to physically lend a hand. I have around 13 polishes in my flock of various colors all of them possess this particular niche for comedy. They are one of my favorite breeds to keep. They require a bit of special care but are well worth the trouble just to have them around.

10. A connection to the past: A lesson in simplicity

There is just something about keeping backyard chickens that brings us back to our roots. Times of old, days gone by when just about everyone had a flock of chickens to supply eggs for the family. A time when gardening was not just a hobby but a way of survival. A time when your land was how you ate and your animals were how you survived. Getting out of bed putting on my boots and heading out to the backyard opening the coops after the night bring a bit of that nostalgia. Cleaning the coops and collecting the days eggs has a feeling of purpose and self sufficiency that many are seeking today. In a world where we can buy literally everything we need at the store, being able to supply your own food has a purity that money cannot buy. Knowing that I am eating a product that is not only organic but supplied by animals that are well cared for and happy brings happiness to my soul.

In our busy and hectic world today, it’s nice to come home and just watch my girls as they forage in the backyard. To be able to escape the chaos of life and just simply be. Chickens are simple creatures, they don’t ask for much but give back much in return. They are content just to be able to hunt and peck their way through life. They don’t worry about much but instead are just happy to be given this day. It’s a lesson in simplicity that I think we all need. For this lesson and more I am ever grateful for my chickens. My chickens give back to me in many way,  but one of the best thing they give is a lesson in keeping it simple, a lesson in simplicity.

With this I bid you ado. I hope that you have found value in this post. If you are just staring out with chickens, I would love to hear from you. It is my goal and mission to help others with their adventure of keeping backyard chickens.

For those that are seasoned chicken keepers, I would love to hear the joys you experience in keeping backyard chickens.

Thanks for reading!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Coops and Blooms

Spring has sprung at the Kuntry Klucker Farm, chicks are peeping and flowers blooming. In this post I will detail how I decorate my backyard for the coming growing season. It is no secret that I tend to go overboard when it comes to decorating the backyard for my girls, this will be a virtual tour, a flower walk if you will. We will start from the coop closest to the yard entrance and work out way out.

When entering the backyard the first coop we come to is Henwarts. Henwarts is the newest addition to the “Coop-hood” and shares a large outdoor pen with The Kuntry Klucker. In front of The Kuntry Klucker I have a row of cinder blocks. These blocks have two purposes, keeps the girls and the dirt in the outdoor pen area and doubles as planters for flowers. Every year in this cinder block row I plant petunias. I love these little super bloomers for many reasons. A few of  the most important are the fact that they display lot of color, tolerate the hot afternoon sun well, and most importantly hold up well around chickens. I have a few ladies that despite my efforts will help themselves to an afternoon snack of petunia blooms. The petunia’s being prolific bloomers look no worse for the wear, recovering very quickly.

The next coop we visit on our backyard tour is my largest coop, The Kuntry Klucker. In front of the Klucker I have a large whiskey barrel full of Gerbera Daisies. Additionally, I have hanging flower baskets. With chickens, keeping flowers above their heads is a must. If at their level they will undoubtedly make a snack out of the blooms. Found at the dollar store, these cute little baskets are just the perfect size for a few flowers. Instead of using cocoa liners that seem to loose their shape after the first two waterings, I opt to use thick weed barrier to hold the potting soil. Attached to the wood of the pen I have planted a variety of flowers in these baskets. Petunias once again taking center stage. I feel that they add a bit of fun to the girls homes.

As we proceed on our coop tour we come to The Coop De Ville. Serving as a Bachelor Pen, the Coop De Ville is home to 4 White Crested Polish Bantam breeding roosters. Situated between the Kuntry Klucker and the Spice Garden, the Coop De Vills shares space with many flowering plants. In front of the Coop De Ville I have planted a white butterfly bush. Butterfly bushes are prolific bloomers and due to their size, they hold up very well around chickens.

Next we come to the spice garden. In this garden I have lot of things planted. The tall bush with the small red blooms is a red honeysuckle bush. Taller than me (I’m 5’8″), this bush is one of the largest in the garden. These highly fragrant little blooms blanket the whole backyard with a sweet fragrance and attract many butterflies and hummingbirds to the backyard, adding to the beauty of the girls surroundings.

I have many of my kitchen spices planted here among the two coops that call this plot home. Roy’s Roost and Betsy’s Bliss are situated here among all the plants a spices. This year I planted a red butterfly bush, in a few months it will be beautifully loaded down with blooms giving the butterflies another place to rest and spread their wings. The chickens are fenced out of this garden area so all the creatures that visit these plants are protected from the girls. This allows many caterpillars to spin cocoons among the thick foliage of many of the plants here.

In the center of this garden I have planted an Arona Berry bush (kin to the Acia Berry), this bush which too is taller than me has the most beautiful white blooms. I use many of the berries that this bush produces in my smoothies. The chickens also love these berries, another reason that I have to fence them out of this garden area. After the berries appear, I make sure that the girls get a good share of the spoil which they go absolutely nuts for. Amongst other plants in this garden I have a Goji Berry Tree, Sage, Rosemary, Oregano, Thyme, and Mint.

Next we come to the TARDIS! This is one of the funnest coops in the “coop-hood”. Painted like the TARDIS from Dr. Who, this coop is home to Silkie’s. Sharing a large plot with the Bantam Boutique I planted a rare Red Hydrangea. The deep red of the hydrangea blooms will add a pop of red and contrasting well with the blue of the TARDIS.

Finally we come to the Bantam Boutique! At the end of the Bantam Boutique I have a pot with several colorful annuals in it. The Polishes enjoy jumping on top of the pen to take a few samples from the flowers. On the far side of the Bantam Boutique I have planted two yellow butterfly bushes. Not only are these bushes beautiful, they offer lots of afternoon shade for the Polishes that call this coop home.

The Kuntry Klucker Farm

In the center of the backyard, resides our veggie garden. The chickens patrol the garden ridding the plants of any available bugs. As they till the soil in search of worms and grubs, they aerate the soil, further aiding the plants. With my theropod crew on duty, I eliminate the use of insecticides, allowing me to grow organic veggies for my family. I do lose a tomato or two to my carnosaur crew, I plant enough so there is plenty to go around. The girls get their share of the spoil in exchange for their hard work.

We now come to the pride and joy of my hobby farm, the grape arbor. Several years ago, I built a grape arbor in my backyard. Grapes have been on my dream list for a long time. Not only are grapes a fast-growing easy-care crop, the arbor can be used as a structure to hang a swing or hammock chairs from. Attaching some patio lights to the arbor adds a nice romantic evening feel. Complete with shade from the grape vines and a place to hand swings, a grape arbor is a great addition for any backyard garden enthusiasts.

I hope that this post has given new ideas on how to decorate a backyard garden paradise. Armed with some annuals, a few hanging baskets and a few pots, you can turn any backyard space into a magical getaway.

As always, thanks for reading. If you have any questions, feel free to post in the comments. You can also catch me on Facebook or drop me a line at kuntryklucker@gmail.com

Till next time, keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~