Keeping Multiple Roosters in Your Backyard Flock.

Contrary to what is commonly thought, keeping multiple roosters in one flock is a worthwhile decision especially if your birds free range. It is a misconception to assume that only one rooster is best to oversee your flock. However, in order for multiple roosters to live in peace with each other, several requirements need to be meet. In this post, I am going to show you how my 6 roosters cohabitant while presiding over their girls. But first, allow me to introduce you to all the boys.

Dracula and Frankenstien: Dracula and Frankenstien are Easter Eggars they roost in The Kuntry Klucker, they grew up together and are buddies.

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Van Gogh: Van Gogh is a Polish part of the same clutch as Dracula and Frankenstein. Because they grew up together and roost in The Kuntry Klucker these three are civil with each other and get along well.

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Enigma: Enigma is a Motted Cochin, he is the oldest of The Kuntry Klucker boys. At 3 years old, he is the senior rooster in The Kuntry Klucker. He is civil with the other three roosters in the coop but prefers to put distance between himself and the others during the day while free ranging. He looks after the oldest girls, Buff Orphingtons who are pushing 9 years old this summer. He also adopted two White Crested Polish ladies that live in another coop further down the “coop-hood” as part of his section of girls to look after.

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Devros and Micky Smith: Devros and Micky Smith share responsibility in taking care of the Silkies that live in the TARDIS. They collectively look after these girls and will run the larger boys off that cross over their boundary line.

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To successfully keep multiple roosters in your flock these three requirements need to be meet.

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1.Ample Space

The first thing to consider in keeping multiple roosters is space. Roosters, if several are present in a flock will divide up the free ranging space into territories. Each rooster will look after a portion of the girls in “his” specified territory. Each rooster will know the boundaries of his dominion. If a rooster should step outside his bounds a confrontation would then ensue. To ensure that your roosters will live peacefully with one another they must have enough space to roam.

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For example, I have 6 roosters roaming my backyard every day. Three of my boys who grew up together (Dracula, Frankenstein and Van Gogh) inhabit the same territory. These three boys have their own hens but are more than comfortable to be near each other during the day, sharing the same territory.

My other 3 roosters are a bit more territorial. Enigma, who roosts in the same coop as Dracula, Frankenstein, and Van Gogh does not really appreciate these three individuals near his ladies. When they are in the backyard he will run them off from the section of the yard that he has claimed as his jurisdiction.

Devros and Micky Smith (my Silkie Roosters) grew up together like Frankenstein, Dracula, and Van Gogh they are civil in sharing the same territory with each other. However, if any other of the boys breech their territorial boundaries they will collectively run off the intruders.

2. Several feeding and watering stations

When free ranging it is the job of the roosters to look for food for the girls. He will hunt for bugs, seeds, or weeds for them to dine on. He will also lead them to food and water if he feels that it’s time for them to eat. Each rooster leading a section of the hens, multiple feeding and watering stations makes it possible for them to take care of the girls while avoiding confrontations over the food and water supply. Each of my coops have their own food and water plus an additional one in the yard to ensure that all my chickens and especially the roosters have ample access to nourishment for both themselves and their ladies.

3. Sufficient number of hens

The roosters and hens will decide amongst themselves who belongs on which rooster team, there needs to be enough hens to go around. It is typical for one rooster to manage and service anywhere from 6-10 hens individually. If there are not enough hens to divide amongst the boys serious problems can arise.

If there are too many rooster for too few hens the hens can become injured through over mating. The hens will be mated too often which can cause feather loss, wounds on her back, and other injuries by aggressive mating by too many roosters. If there are too few hens, fighting amongst the roosters will be more frequent as they compete for the hens.

To combat this problem there are a few solutions that can be implemented. If you want to keep all your boys, you can establish a Bachelor Pen for access roosters. I have two, one for my standard size boys and one for my bantam size boys. All members live peacefully in their bachelor digs.

Another option would be to re-home or cull your access boys. The long and short of it is either an increase in hen number is needed or a decrease in rooster numbers in needed.

I have about 50 hens total and 6 roosters in the yard to look after them and care for them when I am not around. I do have more than 6 roosters, my rooster total is actually 15. I chose the best roosters to be in the yard with the girls, the rest I have placed in bachelor pens. Not all roosters will be best for your ladies, some can be bit rough or too aggressive during mating or with other roosters. The roosters that have the best temperaments with the other boys and gentle with the girls made the cut.

If an unfortunate event transpires where I lose one or more of my boys either to illness or a predator attack, I will then pull from the bachelor pool to fill the job opening. I also keep my boys for breeding. I tend to gravitate towards the more rare breeds so being able to procreate my flock is of value to me. Thus, unlike a lot of backyard chickens keepers I hang on to all my boys. I have found throughout my years of keeping chickens that a rooster is a creature of value and worth. I may not need the service of all 15 at one time but there may come a time where I will need them.

I hope that you have found this post helpful in managing roosters in your flock. If you live in the city, roosters are most likely not permitted. However, those that live in the county or country have more options when it comes to roosters.

I am of the persuasion that roosters are an amazing creature. I value them for the part they play in the social structure of a flock. In the past, I have sustained a span of several years where I did not have a rooster. During this time I learned the true value of a rooster and the completion and balance that his presence truly brings to my flock.

Roosters are not the blood thirsty vicious creature of the past. When hand raised and raised with care they make a very admirable addition to the backyard or barnyard setting.

Before I go, I want to leave with you a video of my roosters greeting the new day.

As always, thanks for reading!!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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Bachelor Pens for Roosters

When faced with a surplus of roosters many people panic because they don’t know what to do. They know of several options from days of old such things as freezer camp (butchering surplus roosters), giving them away, or just hoping for the best with so many boys around. Might I suggest another approach. A bachelor pen. I currently have two bachelor pens for my boys. One for the Standard size and another for the Bantam size boys. I could probably keep them together in one large pen, but I feel better separating them into two pens.

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A rooster is a selfless creature, often sacrificing himself to save the lives of your girls. A fearless warrior with a heart of gold. Majestic and beautiful, a natural born singer who writes his own songs. A dancer, who loves to waltz for those he cares about. A true gentlemen. And sadly the most abused, unwanted, and forgotten of all the creatures.

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I love roosters, I value their role in a backyard flock as protectors and caretakers of my hens. I have found myself in the past not having enough roosters and needing them desperately.

When I first started out with chicken keeping I was terrified of roosters. I did not want one at any cost. I prayed and hoped that my batch of chicks were all girls like I had ordered. Well as fate would have it, I had three roosters, I panicked! What was I going to do with all these roosters? I could maybe stomach keeping just one, but the rest had to go. After some time and hard work, I found homes for the other two and just kept one. His name was Roy, through him I learned how wonderful roosters really are. Roy taught me so much. I owe him a debt of graditude, he was a gentleman with feathers. I was shocked at how tame he was, I realized how wrong I had been for being so afraid of him.

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To my detriment Roy passed after several years due to illness. I was without a rooster for 5 years. Till finally throughout the years my girls passed away and I needed more chickens. This time I was excited as my chicks got older some began to crow. I finally had roosters!! Now I have about 15 roosters, a little more than what I was hoping for but a surplus at least.

So now the question comes up, what am I going to do with all these glorious boys? Well, instead of freaking out and trying to unload as many as I can, I am going to keep them ALL. I cannot keep all of them with my girls, that would be an unhealthy situation for my hens. Instead I am going to prepare for them their own digs, a bachelor pen.

Roosters, when raised up in the same flock are more corgial than most people might think. If raised together from chickhood they can and do cohabitant together very well. Roosters fight when they have something that they need to defend. Without access to hens, there is nothing to defend. This is how a bachelor pen works.

So, all of my surplus roosters will find their forever home here on my farm in their own special digs. Separate from the hens, they will live in a bachelor pen. They will have a large outdoor pen for which to roam and hunt for bugs when the weather is good. But they will have no access to the hens, squandering any need to fight or claim territory over one another. I will choose a few that will run with the girls and protect my flock while they are free ranging. As for the rest, instead of freezer camp they will live peacefully in the bachelor pen that I have prepared for them.

I find a lot of value in roosters and will not re-home any of them. If for some reason one of the roosters heading up a flock becomes ill or even worse passes away, I will have others to take his place. A situation I did not have years ago when I needed it so desperately.

So for those that are panicking because you have more roosters than you counted on, don’t freak out. Prepare a bachelor pen for them to live in. You don’t need to go to all the work of trying to franticly find a home or someone else that will take him off your hands. Keep your boys, just put them in a separate coop and pen and enjoy the songs they sing for you.

Roosters really are wonderful creatures and deserve much better than what they are often dealt. You don’t have to get rid of your boys, the time may come when you will need one. Whether for protection from predators or the need to procreate your flock.

I hope that this post was helpful in sorting out a common rooster issues.

To see a video of my bachelor pens visit my youtube channel by clicking on the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vxwn5Y7fo7E

It is also possible to keep more than one rooster in your flock. To see how I manage more than one rooster in my flock with the hens please click here.

As always, thanks for reading. If you have any questions feel free to post in the comments and I will get back to you as soon as I can.

Till next time, keep on crowing!

~ The Kuntry Klucker Crew ~

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